Faculty Profile

Dr. SueAnn Schatz

sschatz@lhup.edu | 313 Raub Hall, Lock Haven, PA 17745 | (570) 484-2641

Education: PhD, English Literature, University of New Mexico

Courses Most Commonly Taught: Advanced Topics in British Literature, Major British Authors, Humanities Seminar, Survey of British Literature After 1800, Introduction to Literature, Composition

Courses Developed: Major British Writers:  The Brontës; Major British Writers:  Shakespeare (London program); Major British Writers:  Jane Austen;  Advanced Topics in British Literature:  Class, Gender & Race in the Victorian Novel; Advanced Topics in British Literature:  Victorian Women Writers; Advanced Topics in British Literature:  Radical Love in the 19th Century--The Novels of Austen, the Brontës, and Eliot; Humanities Seminar:  Nineteenth-Century British Feminist Literature; Humanities Seminar:  Contemporary Native American Fiction; Humanities Seminar:  British Romanticism 

Research Areas: 19th century British literature, Victorian women writers

Books Published: 

Ed. with introductions.  The Years That the Locust Hath Eaten (1895) and Joanna Traill, Spinster (1893) by Annie E. Holdsworth, Vol. 5 New Woman Fiction 1881-99 series (London:  Pickering & Chatto, 2011).

Ed. with Carolyn Oulton.  Mary Cholmondeley Reconsidered (London:  Pickering & Chatto, 2010).

Articles Published: 

“How to be a Feminist Without Saying So:  The New Woman and the New Man in Red Pottage.” Mary Cholmondeley Reconsidered.

“Touring the Birth of Shakespeare” and “Celebrating Shakespeare at the Globe” (sidebars to “London Calling: Program Brings History and Theater to Life for LHU Students”). Lock Haven University Perspective (Fall 2009):  7-8.

Rev. of Margaret Fuller:  Transatlantic Crossings in a Revolutionary Age.  Charles Capper and Cristina Giorcelli, eds. (University of Wisconsin Press, 2007).  Journal of British Studies 48.1 (January 2009): 243-4.

“Charlotte Brontë.”  Companion to the British Short Story.   Ed. Andrew Maunder.  New York: Facts on File (2007).

“Rhoda Broughton.”  Companion to the British Short Story.   Ed. Andrew Maunder.  New York: Facts on File (2007).

Aurora Leigh as Paradigm of Domestic-Professional Fiction.”  Philological Quarterly 79.1 (Winter 2000):  91-117. Rpt. in Poetry Criticism.  Ed. Larry Trudeau.  Vol. 62.  Detroit:  Gale (May 2005).

Rev. of Elizabeth Barrett Browning, by Simon Avery and Rebecca Stott (Longman/Pearson Education, 2003). Journal of the Midwest Modern Language Association 37.2 (Fall 2004).

“Class Counts: The Domestic-Professional Writer, the Working Poor and Middle-Class Values in The Years Thatthe Locust Hath Eaten and The Story of a Modern Woman.”  Silent Voices:  Forgotten Novels ofVictorianWomen Writers.  Ed. Brenda Ayres.  Westport, CT: Praeger (2003).

Aurora Leigh as Paradigm of Domestic-Professional Fiction.”  Philological Quarterly 79.1 (Winter 2000):  91-117.

“Charlotte Brontë.” Biographical Dictionary of Literary Influences:  The NineteenthCentury, 1800-1914.  Ed. John Powell.  Westport, CT:  Greenwood Press, 2000.

“Mary Shelley.”  Biographical Dictionary of Literary Influences:  The NineteenthCentury, 1800-1914.  Ed. John Powell.  Westport, CT:  Greenwood Press, 2000.

Rev. of Romantic Ideology Unmasked by Marjean D. Purinton (University of Delaware Press, 1994).  RockyMountain Review of Language and Literature 49.2 (1995):  203-5.

“’Then they are always speaking against Yorkshire ways and Yorkshire folk’:  The Use of Dialect in Charlotte Brontë’s Shirley and Charles Dickens’s Hard Times.”  TAG:  Journal of theSouthwest Symposium (April 1994):  192-96.

“’Your Girls That You All Love Are Mine Already’:  Sexual Imagery and Politics in Bram Stoker’s Dracula,” collaborative essay with Penny Allison, Susan J. Levasseur, Mitzi K. McGuire, Lori Kula Mehl and Sara Spurgeon.  La Ventana:  Journal of the Southwest Symposium (June 1993):  115-54.

 Areas of Expertise: 19th-century British literature; 19th-century British women writers, particularly late Victorian

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