General Education Requirements

The following general education requirements will be implemented fall 2014.

  • Students who started enrollment at Lock Haven University prior to fall 2014 - Review the “crosswalk” to determine how courses previously taken meet the requirements
  • All new fall 2014 students will meet the general education requirements below.

Bachelors Degrees   |   Associate of Arts Degrees   |   Associate of Science Degrees
Associate of Applied Science Degrees   |   Associate of Science in Nursing Degrees

 

Bachelors Degrees

 INTELLECTUAL FOUNDATIONStudents will acquire and critically evaluate information, apply quantitative and analytical reasoning to problem solving, and present well-organized arguments and conclusions in both written and oral forms.

 

COURSES THAT MEET   REQUIREMENT

 Written Communication Students will communicate effectively in writing.
1. Address assignment effectively by clearly developing and communicating the purpose for writing.
2. Incorporate relevant examples or evidence to support the central ideas or conclusions.
3. Organize ideas and supporting materials in unified and coherent patterns, using genre-appropriate techniques.
4. Employ effective search strategies to find, evaluate, and integrate appropriate sources (Information Literacy).
5. Use information in a legal and ethical manner following appropriate disciplinary guidelines(Information Literacy).
6. Demonstrate understanding of the writing process, which could include prewriting, drafting, and revising.
7. Display facility with the conventions of written American English (grammar, usage, mechanics, punctuation, diction, and sentence variety).

3.0 sh

 Courses

 Oral Communication Students will communicate effectively in multiple oral presentations to live audiences within a course.   Each subsequent presentation should utilize revision through the process of feedback, training, and performance.
1. Appropriately connect topic and personal credibility with a live audience.
2. Demonstrate an original, well-organized presentation with clear introduction, transitions, and closure.
3. Communicate an oral message conveying relevant knowledge and accurate word choice and grammar.
4. Use effective presentation aids, such as speaker notes, media, and appropriate dress.
5. Illustrate both appropriate physical expressiveness and energy control.
6. Articulate message with both appropriate vocal dynamics and control.

3.0 sh

 Courses

 Mathematical and Computational Thinking Students will identify, develop, evaluate, and communicate solutions to mathematical and computational problems.
1. Determine mathematical or computational processes needed for solving various problems.
2. Apply formal inductive and deductive reasoning techniques.
3. Apply mathematical or computational processes to solve problems, make judgments, draw conclusions, and make predictions.
4. Communicate mathematical or computational ideas logically and clearly.

3.0 sh

 Courses

 KNOWLEDGE AND INQUIRYStudents will gain the knowledge, perspective, and analytical skills to critically evaluate ideas, concepts, and themes in a variety of disciplines. Courses satisfying these areas must stress broad-based knowledge of major concepts, theories, themes, and modes of inquiry and analyses within that discipline. Other area specific outcomes are included below.

 

 

 Natural Sciences Inquiry (at least one course with lab) All courses must meet Outcomes 1-4; lab courses must also meet Outcome 5
1. Demonstrate knowledge of a breadth of major principles and concepts in a natural sciences discipline, including biology, chemistry, geology, and physics.
2. Explain natural phenomena or events and their impact on individual organisms, societies, or the world.
3. Apply quantitative analyses to solve problems within the context of the natural sciences.
4. Demonstrate a conceptual understanding of the scientific method.
5. Apply scientific concepts, methods, and quantitative analyses to solve problems through laboratory investigations and communicate findings in numeric, graphic, or written forms.

6.0 sh

 Courses

 Historical, Behavioral, and Social Sciences Inquiry 1. Identify and apply the fundamental concepts and methods of inquiry for a discipline that studies the individual, society, and social relations, including anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, psychology, and sociology.
2. Demonstrate knowledge or understanding of developments, themes, issues, cultures, people, places, or institutions as required for specific disciplinary approaches.
3. Use empirical methods to interpret and evaluate historical developments, individual behavior, or contemporary society and social relations.
4. Apply understanding of historical or social-scientific concepts to students' own lives or culture.

6.0 sh

 Courses

 Philosophical, Literary, and Aesthetic Inquiry (One course must come from Visual or Performing Arts and one from Philosophy or Literature) Qualifying courses must satisfy at least two of the following:
1. Demonstrate understanding of terms, forms, figures, or movements in a significant area of Philosophical or Aesthetic inquiry.
2. Exhibit knowledge of literature, artistic productions, or philosophies as products of specific social, cultural, or political contexts.
3. Apply appropriate methods and criteria to interpret and critique philosophical theories, works of literature, or artifacts in the visual or performing arts.
4. Apply knowledge of a relevant area of aesthetic or philosophical inquiry to produce a work of artistic expression.

9.0 sh

 Courses

 PERSONAL AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITYStudents will demonstrate responsible personal, societal, and global awareness.

 

 

 Global Awareness and Citizenship (One Course must fulfill historical foundation component of the competency) Students will gain the knowledge, disciplinary skills, ethical reasoning abilities, and appreciation of international and multicultural perspectives needed to conduct themselves as responsible citizens of the world. All qualified courses must meet at least two of the following learning outcomes, and students will be required to take one course that includes #4:
1. Identify and analyze the interconnectedness of global trends or issues by using the concepts and methods of a discipline or interdisciplinary field.
2. Examine cultural, international, or global practices or events from a variety of perspectives, bringing to light unstated assumptions.
3. Appreciate the impact of personal and societal actions on the world, and evaluate that impact in ethical terms. 
4. Describe the historical foundations of political orders, economic systems, philosophies, social developments, or environmental issues, and their relation to the world today. Alternative ways of satisfying Global Awareness and Citizenship competency:
1. Language: Speaking, reading, writing, and listening in a non-native language: Up to six credits of college-level language may be counted towards this competency (with one course counting for no more than three credits).
2. Study abroad: Semester-long study abroad satisfies 6 credits of this competency.
3. International students that matriculate at LHU will be deemed to have met six credits of this competency.

9.0 sh

 Courses

 Wellness Students will gain the knowledge and skills necessary to develop a proactive approach to a positive, vigorous, and wellness-oriented lifestyle.
1. Identify and analyze the interrelationships among the physical, social, emotional, intellectual, spiritual, environmental, and occupational components of wellness.
2. Recognize and examine resources and strategies that enhance personal wellness.
3. Describe individual and socio-cultural influences that affect personal wellness and wellness choices.
4. Develop an awareness of interdependent relationships between personal wellness and society.

3.0 sh

 Courses

TOTAL CREDITS

42.0 sh

 

 Competencies

  • 2 Written Communication courses (beyond ENGL100)
  • 2 Critical Thinking courses
  • 2 Experiential Learning Units (each unit equals 14   hours)

 

 Courses

 Note: A single course may be used to satisfy only one GE course requirement in “Knowledge and Inquiry” and “Global Awareness and Citizenship” (e.g., The English Department could submit ENGL220 World Literature to count either for the “Knowledge and Inquiry” category or the “Global Awareness and Citizenship,” category but not both. A single course may, however, be used to satisfy a course and an overlay requirement (e.g., The Mathematics Department could submit MATH107: Basic Statistics for Intellectual Foundations and a Critical Thinking overlay). 

Associate of Arts Degrees

 INTELLECTUAL FOUNDATIONStudents will acquire and critically evaluate information, apply quantitative and analytical reasoning to problem solving, and present well-organized arguments and conclusions in both written and oral forms.

 

COURSES THAT MEET   REQUIREMENT

 Written Communication Students will communicate effectively in writing.
1. Address assignment effectively by clearly developing and communicating the purpose for writing.
2. Incorporate relevant examples or evidence to support the central ideas or conclusions.
3. Organize ideas and supporting materials in unified and coherent patterns, using genre-appropriate techniques.
4. Employ effective search strategies to find, evaluate, and integrate appropriate sources (Information Literacy).
5. Use information in a legal and ethical manner following appropriate disciplinary guidelines(Information Literacy).
6. Demonstrate understanding of the writing process, which could include prewriting, drafting, and revising.
7. Display facility with the conventions of written American English (grammar, usage, mechanics, punctuation, diction, and sentence variety).

3.0 sh

 Courses

 Oral Communication Students will communicate effectively in multiple oral presentations to live audiences within a course. Each subsequent presentation should utilize revision through the process of feedback, training, and performance.
1. Appropriately connect topic and personal credibility with a live audience.
2. Demonstrate an original, well-organized presentation with clear introduction, transitions, and closure.
3. Communicate an oral message conveying relevant knowledge and accurate word choice and grammar.
4. Use effective presentation aids, such as speaker notes, media, and appropriate dress.
5. Illustrate both appropriate physical expressiveness and energy control.
6. Articulate message with both appropriate vocal dynamics and control.

3.0 sh

 Courses

 Mathematical and Computational Thinking Students will identify, develop, evaluate, and communicate solutions to mathematical and computational problems.
1. Determine mathematical or computational processes needed for solving various problems.
2. Apply formal inductive and deductive reasoning techniques.
3. Apply mathematical or computational processes to solve problems, make judgments, draw conclusions, and make predictions.
4. Communicate mathematical or computational ideas logically and clearly.

3.0 sh

 Courses

 KNOWLEDGE AND INQUIRYStudents will gain the knowledge, perspective, and analytical skills to critically evaluate ideas, concepts, and themes in a variety of disciplines. Courses satisfying these areas must stress broad-based knowledge of major concepts, theories, themes, and modes of inquiry and analyses within that discipline. Other area specific outcomes are included below.

 

 

 Natural Sciences Inquiry (with lab) All courses must meet Outcomes 1-4; lab courses must also meet Outcome 5
1. Demonstrate knowledge of a breadth of major principles and concepts in a natural sciences discipline, including biology, chemistry, geology, and physics.
2. Explain natural phenomena or events and their impact on individual organisms, societies, or the world.
3. Apply quantitative analyses to solve problems within the context of the natural sciences.
4. Demonstrate a conceptual understanding of the scientific method.
5. Apply scientific concepts, methods, and quantitative analyses to solve problems through laboratory investigations and communicate findings in numeric, graphic, or written forms.

3.0 sh

 Courses

 Historical, Behavioral, and Social Sciences Inquiry 1. Identify and apply the fundamental concepts and methods of inquiry for a discipline that studies the individual, society, and social relations, including anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, psychology, and sociology.
2. Demonstrate knowledge or understanding of developments, themes, issues, cultures, people, places, or institutions as required for specific disciplinary approaches.
3. Use empirical methods to interpret and evaluate historical developments, individual behavior, or contemporary society and social relations.
4. Apply understanding of historical or social-scientific concepts to students' own lives or culture.

6.0 sh

 Courses

 Philosophical, Literary, and Aesthetic Inquiry Qualifying courses must satisfy at least two of the following:
1. Demonstrate understanding of terms, forms, figures, or movements in a significant area of Philosophical or Aesthetic inquiry.
2. Exhibit knowledge of literature, artistic productions, or philosophies as products of specific social, cultural, or political contexts.
3. Apply appropriate methods and criteria to interpret and critique philosophical theories, works of literature, or artifacts in the visual or performing arts.
4. Apply knowledge of a relevant area of aesthetic or philosophical inquiry to produce a work of artistic expression.

3.0 sh

 Courses

 PERSONAL AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITYStudents will demonstrate responsible personal, societal, and global awareness.

 

 

 Global Awareness and Citizenship (One Course must fulfill historical foundation   component of the competency) Students will gain the knowledge, disciplinary skills, ethical reasoning abilities, and appreciation of international and multicultural perspectives needed to conduct themselves as responsible citizens of the world. All qualified courses must meet at least two of the following learning outcomes, and students will be required to take one course that includes #4:
1. Identify and analyze the interconnectedness of global trends or issues by using the concepts and methods of a discipline or interdisciplinary field.
2. Examine cultural, international, or global practices or events from a variety of perspectives, bringing to light unstated assumptions.
3. Appreciate the impact of personal and societal actions on the world, and evaluate that impact in ethical terms. 
4. Describe the historical foundations of political orders, economic systems, philosophies, social developments, or environmental issues, and their relation to the world today. Alternative ways of satisfying Global Awareness and Citizenship competency:
1. Language: Speaking, reading, writing, and listening in a non-native language: Up to six credits of college-level language may be counted towards this competency (with one course counting for no more than three credits).
2. Study abroad: Semester-long study abroad satisfies 6 credits of this competency.
3. International students that matriculate at LHU will be deemed to have met six credits of this competency.

6.0 sh

 Courses

 Wellness Students will gain the knowledge and skills necessary to develop a proactive approach to a positive, vigorous, and wellness-oriented lifestyle.
1. Identify and analyze the interrelationships among the physical, social, emotional, intellectual, spiritual, environmental, and occupational components of wellness.
2. Recognize and examine resources and strategies that enhance personal wellness.
3. Describe individual and socio-cultural influences that affect personal wellness and wellness choices. < br/>4. Develop an awareness of interdependent relationships between personal wellness and society.

3.0 sh

 Courses

TOTAL CREDITS

30.0 sh

 

 Competency

  • 1 Critical Thinking course

 

 Courses

Associate of Science Degrees

 INTELLECTUAL FOUNDATIONStudents will acquire and critically evaluate information, apply quantitative and analytical reasoning to problem solving, and present well-organized arguments and conclusions in both written and oral forms.

 

COURSES THAT MEET   REQUIREMENT

 Written Communication Students will communicate effectively in writing.
1. Address assignment effectively by clearly developing and communicating the purpose for writing.
2. Incorporate relevant examples or evidence to support the central ideas or conclusions.
3. Organize ideas and supporting materials in unified and coherent patterns, using genre-appropriate techniques.
4. Employ effective search strategies to find, evaluate, and integrate appropriate sources (Information Literacy).
5. Use information in a legal and ethical manner following appropriate disciplinary guidelines(Information Literacy).
6. Demonstrate understanding of the writing process, which could include prewriting, drafting, and revising.
7. Display facility with the conventions of written American English (grammar, usage, mechanics, punctuation, diction, and sentence variety).

3.0 sh

 Courses

 Oral Communication Students will communicate effectively in multiple oral presentations to live audiences within a course.   Each subsequent presentation should utilize revision through the process of feedback, training, and performance.
1. Appropriately connect topic and personal credibility with a live audience.
2. Demonstrate an original, well-organized presentation with clear introduction, transitions, and closure.
3. Communicate an oral message conveying relevant knowledge and accurate word choice and grammar.
4. Use effective presentation aids, such as speaker notes, media, and appropriate dress.
5. Illustrate both appropriate physical expressiveness and energy control.
6. Articulate message with both appropriate vocal dynamics and control.

3.0 sh

 Courses

 Mathematical and Computational Thinking Students will identify, develop, evaluate, and communicate solutions to mathematical and computational problems.
1. Determine mathematical or computational processes needed for solving various problems.
2. Apply formal inductive and deductive reasoning techniques.
3. Apply mathematical or computational processes to solve problems, make judgments, draw conclusions, and make predictions.
4. Communicate mathematical or computational ideas logically and clearly.

3.0 sh

 Courses

 KNOWLEDGE AND INQUIRYStudents will gain the knowledge, perspective, and analytical skills to critically evaluate ideas, concepts, and themes in a variety of disciplines. Courses satisfying these areas must stress broad-based knowledge of major concepts, theories, themes, and modes of inquiry and analyses within that discipline. Other area specific outcomes are included below.

 

 

 Natural Sciences Inquiry (with lab) All courses must meet Outcomes 1-4; lab courses must also meet Outcome 5
1. Demonstrate knowledge of a breadth of major principles and concepts in a natural sciences discipline, including biology, chemistry, geology, and physics.
2. Explain natural phenomena or events and their impact on individual organisms, societies, or the world.
3. Apply quantitative analyses to solve problems within the context of the natural sciences.
4. Demonstrate a conceptual understanding of the scientific method.
5. Apply scientific concepts, methods, and quantitative analyses to solve problems through laboratory investigations and communicate findings in numeric, graphic, or written forms.

3.0 sh

 Courses

 Historical, Behavioral, and Social Sciences Inquiry 1. Identify and apply the fundamental concepts and methods of inquiry for a discipline that studies the individual, society, and social relations, including anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, psychology, and sociology.
2. Demonstrate knowledge or understanding of developments, themes, issues, cultures, people, places, or institutions as required for specific disciplinary approaches.
3. Use empirical methods to interpret and evaluate historical developments, individual behavior, or contemporary society and social relations.
4. Apply understanding of historical or social-scientific concepts to students' own lives or culture.

3.0 sh

 Courses

 Philosophical, Literary, and Aesthetic Inquiry Qualifying courses must satisfy at least two of the following:
1. Demonstrate understanding of terms, forms, figures, or movements in a significant area of Philosophical or Aesthetic inquiry.
2. Exhibit knowledge of literature, artistic productions, or philosophies as products of specific social, cultural, or political contexts.
3. Apply appropriate methods and criteria to interpret and critique philosophical theories, works of literature, or artifacts in the visual or performing arts.
4. Apply knowledge of a relevant area of aesthetic or philosophical inquiry to produce a work of artistic expression.

3.0 sh

 Courses

 PERSONAL AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITYStudents will demonstrate responsible personal, societal, and global awareness.

 

 

 Global Awareness and Citizenship Students will gain the knowledge, disciplinary skills, ethical reasoning abilities, and appreciation of international and multicultural perspectives needed to conduct themselves as responsible citizens of the world.
All qualified courses must meet at least two of the following learning outcomes, and students will be required to take one course that includes #4:
1. Identify and analyze the interconnectedness of global trends or issues by using the concepts and methods of a discipline or interdisciplinary field.
2. Examine cultural, international, or global practices or events from a variety of perspectives, bringing to light unstated assumptions.
3. Appreciate the impact of personal and societal actions on the world, and evaluate that impact in ethical terms. 
4. Describe the historical foundations of political orders, economic systems, philosophies, social developments, or environmental issues, and their relation to the world today. Alternative ways of satisfying Global Awareness and Citizenship competency:
1. Language: Speaking, reading, writing, and listening in a non-native language: Up to six credits of college-level language may be counted towards this competency (with one course counting for no more than three credits).
2. Study abroad: Semester-long study abroad satisfies 6 credits of this competency.
3. International students that matriculate at LHU will be deemed to have met six credits of this competency.

3.0 sh

 Courses

 Wellness Students will gain the knowledge and skills necessary to develop a proactive approach to a positive, vigorous, and wellness-oriented lifestyle.
1. Identify and analyze the interrelationships among the physical, social, emotional, intellectual, spiritual, environmental, and occupational components of wellness.
2. Recognize and examine resources and strategies that enhance personal wellness.
3. Describe individual and socio-cultural influences that affect personal wellness and wellness choices.
4. Develop an awareness of interdependent relationships between personal wellness and society.

3.0 sh

 Courses

TOTAL CREDITS

24.0 sh

 

 Competencies

  • 2 Critical Thinking courses

 

 Courses

Associate of Applied Science and Associate of Science in Nursing Degrees

 INTELLECTUAL FOUNDATIONStudents will acquire and critically evaluate information, apply quantitative and analytical reasoning to problem solving, and present well-organized arguments and conclusions in both written and oral forms.

 

COURSES THAT MEET   REQUIREMENT

 Written Communication Students will communicate effectively in writing.
1. Address assignment effectively by clearly developing and communicating the purpose for writing.
2. Incorporate relevant examples or evidence to support the central ideas or conclusions.
3. Organize ideas and supporting materials in unified and coherent patterns, using genre-appropriate techniques.
4. Employ effective search strategies to find, evaluate, and integrate appropriate sources (Information Literacy).
5. Use information in a legal and ethical manner following appropriate disciplinary guidelines(Information Literacy).
6. Demonstrate understanding of the writing process, which could include prewriting, drafting, and revising.
7. Display facility with the conventions of written American English (grammar, usage, mechanics, punctuation, diction, and sentence variety).

3.0 sh

 Courses

 Oral Communication Students will communicate effectively in multiple oral presentations to live audiences within a course.   Each subsequent presentation should utilize revision through the process of feedback, training, and performance.
1. Appropriately connect topic and personal credibility with a live audience.
2. Demonstrate an original, well-organized presentation with clear introduction, transitions, and closure.
3. Communicate an oral message conveying relevant knowledge and accurate word choice and grammar.
4. Use effective presentation aids, such as speaker notes, media, and appropriate dress.
5. Illustrate both appropriate physical expressiveness and energy control.
6. Articulate message with both appropriate vocal dynamics and control.

3.0 sh

 Courses

 Mathematical and Computational Thinking Students will identify, develop, evaluate, and communicate solutions to mathematical and computational problems.
1. Determine mathematical or computational processes needed for solving various problems.
2. Apply formal inductive and deductive reasoning techniques.
3. Apply mathematical or computational processes to solve problems, make judgments, draw conclusions, and make predictions.
4. Communicate mathematical or computational ideas logically and clearly.

3.0 sh

 Courses

 KNOWLEDGE AND INQUIRYStudents will gain the knowledge, perspective, and analytical skills to critically evaluate ideas, concepts, and themes in a variety of disciplines. Courses satisfying these areas must stress broad-based knowledge of major concepts, theories, themes, and modes of inquiry and analyses within that discipline. Other area specific outcomes are included below.

 

 

 Natural Sciences Inquiry (with lab) All courses must meet Outcomes 1-4; lab courses must also meet Outcome 5
1. Demonstrate knowledge of a breadth of major principles and concepts in a natural sciences discipline, including biology, chemistry, geology, and physics.
2. Explain natural phenomena or events and their impact on individual organisms, societies, or the world.
3. Apply quantitative analyses to solve problems within the context of the natural sciences.
4. Demonstrate a conceptual understanding of the scientific method.
5. Apply scientific concepts, methods, and quantitative analyses to solve problems through laboratory investigations and communicate findings in numeric, graphic, or written forms.

3.0 sh

 Courses

 Historical, Behavioral, and Social Sciences Inquiry 1. Identify and apply the fundamental concepts and methods of inquiry for a discipline that studies the individual, society, and social relations, including anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, psychology, and sociology.
2. Demonstrate knowledge or understanding of developments, themes, issues, cultures, people, places, or institutions as required for specific disciplinary approaches.
3. Use empirical methods to interpret and evaluate historical developments, individual behavior, or contemporary society and social relations.
4. Apply understanding of historical or social-scientific concepts to students' own lives or culture.

3.0 sh

 Courses

 Philosophical, Literary, and Aesthetic Inquiry Qualifying courses must satisfy at least two of the following:
1. Demonstrate understanding of terms, forms, figures, or movements in a significant area of Philosophical or Aesthetic inquiry.
2. Exhibit knowledge of literature, artistic productions, or philosophies as products of specific social, cultural, or political contexts.
3. Apply appropriate methods and criteria to interpret and critique philosophical theories, works of literature, or artifacts in the visual or performing arts.
4. Apply knowledge of a relevant area of aesthetic or philosophical inquiry to produce a work of artistic expression.

3.0 sh

 Courses

 PERSONAL AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITYStudents will demonstrate responsible personal, societal, and global awareness.

 

 

 Global Awareness and Citizenship Students will gain the knowledge, disciplinary skills, ethical reasoning abilities, and appreciation of international and multicultural perspectives needed to conduct themselves as responsible citizens of the world. All qualified courses must meet at least two of the following learning outcomes, and students will be required to take one course that includes #4:
1. Identify and analyze the interconnectedness of global trends or issues by using the concepts and methods of a discipline or interdisciplinary field.
2. Examine cultural, international, or global practices or events from a variety of perspectives, bringing to light unstated assumptions.
3. Appreciate the impact of personal and societal actions on the world, and evaluate that impact in ethical terms. 
4. Describe the historical foundations of political orders, economic systems, philosophies, social developments, or environmental issues, and their relation to the world today. Alternative ways of satisfying Global Awareness and Citizenship competency:
1. Language: Speaking, reading, writing, and listening in a non-native language: Up to six credits of college-level language may be counted towards this competency (with one course counting for no more than three credits).
2. Study abroad: Semester-long study abroad satisfies 6 credits of this competency.
3. International students that matriculate at LHU will be deemed to have met six credits of this competency.

3.0 sh

 Courses

TOTAL CREDITS

21.0 sh

 

 Competency

  • 1 Critical Thinking course

 

 Courses

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