Course Descriptions - B

A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  L  M  N  P  R  S  T  W

Biology

BIOL101 Basic Biology
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

Covers topics across the biological hierarchy from atoms to issues of global ecology including genetics, molecular biology, and evolution.  The intent is to further students' understanding of the impact of biological phenomena on their lives.  Humans may provide the focus of some discussions; however, emphases include broader aspects of biological phenomena.  Laboratory exercises provide students with practical experience using the scientific method.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

BIOL102 Environmental Science
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
This course for non-majors integrates the introduction to ecological principles and concepts with an examination of the biological basis of contemporary environmental problems. It presents a treatment of central topics in environmental science by examining social, political, ethical, and economic factors that influence the biological aspects of environmental issues such as population control, pollution, land use, as well as conservation of natural resources and natural habitats. Laboratory exercises are designed to demonstrate some of the biological aspects of environmental issues and introduce students to basic processes used in environmental research. Meets general education requirement for laboratory science. May not be counted toward the Biology, Natural Sciences or Biology/Chemistry major requirements.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite: None

BIOL103 Inquiry into Biology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Develops a strong conceptual understanding of life science and stresses the nature and the processes of science as they relate to the fundamental principles of biology that are emphasized in the National Science Education Standards. The course models hands-on, inquiry-based practices as students use reasoning, analysis, scientific processes, procedures and tools of scientific investigations to learn about the structure and functions of organisms, continuity of life and ecological systems.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite: None

BIOL106 Principles of Biology 1

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An introduction to biology with emphasis on the chemistry of life, cell structure and function, cellular metabolism and cell reproduction.  Laboratory exercises are designed to reinforce principles covered in lecture and to provide students with experiences in making observations, hypothesis testing, and data collection, analysis and interpretation.  This course is designed for science and health science majors.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

BIOL107 Principles of Biology 2

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A continuation of BIOL106: Principles of Biology I with emphasis on cell reproduction and development, genetics, molecular biology, biological evolution and the diversity of life, behavioral ecology, and fundamentals of ecology.  Laboratory exercises are designed to reinforce and supplement principles covered in lecture and to provide students with experiences in making observations, hypothesis testing, and data collection, analysis and interpretation.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL106 )

Corequisite:   None

BIOL108 Field Natural History

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A survey course examining the variety of living things in Pennsylvania by focusing on the evolutionary history, taxonomy, life histories, diversity and ecological value of a variety of representative and biologically important groups of organisms.  The impacts of human interactions with organisms are studied throughout the course.  The course emphasizes identification of species (or other taxa) of plants and animals, habitat needs and their influence on economics and social life of humans.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

BIOL125 Topics in Biology (3.0 sh)

An introduction to fundamental biological concepts in the context of contemporary biological issues that affect citizens of human communities and members of broader biotic communities.  Antibiotic resistance, human reproduction, disease, bio-magnification, climate change, and community level impacts of invasive species are just some of the contemporary topics that may be explored.  Students will experience why biology is a fascinating human endeavor.  Intended for non-science majors.

Prerequisite: None

BIOL130 Human Biology for Social Workers (3.0 sh)

An overview of human bodily form and function appropriate for Social Work majors.  Particular focus will be on where and to what degree the disciplines of Biology and Social Work overlap.  The course will provide students with a foundational skill-set in biological knowledge for future employment in the field of social work.

Prerequisite:  BIOL101

BIOL200 Marine Biology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A study of plant and animal life in the marine environment. Emphasis will be on physical and chemical factors affecting the biota in the intertidal, open water, and benthic habitats. Common biota characteristic of each habitat will be investigated in terms of their natural history, morphology and ecological relationships. Laboratory and field exercises will emphasize the identification, anatomy, physiology, systematics and behavior of marine plants and animals as well as the physical and chemical properties of seawater. This class will be taught during summer session at the Wallops Island Campus of the Marine Science Consortium by faculty from various member universities.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL106 AND BIOL107 )

Corequisite:   None

BIOL202 Genetics

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

An overview of the basic principles of Mendelian genetics, cytogenetics, molecular genetics, and population genetics. Laboratory exercises emphasize molecular techniques, statistical evaluation of results, and case studies.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL106 AND BIOL107 )

Corequisite:   ( CHEM121 )

BIOL205 Marine Ecology
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]
A study of the interrelationships among animals, plants, and physical and chemical aspects of the marine environment with an emphasis on unique adaptations for survival. This class is taught during summer session at the Wallops Island Campus of the Marine Science Consortium by faculty from various member universities.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL106 AND BIOL107 )

Corequisite:   None

BIOL206 Botany
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
An introduction to the principles of botany. Emphasis is placed on the integration of structure and function that reflect plant diversity and evolution. The primary models are angiosperms, but also include discussion of other plant taxa. Topics covered include plant cellular structure, anatomy and morphology of stems, roots and leaves and flowers, transport processes, photosynthesis, plant growth and development, plant diversity, and economic botany.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL106 AND BIOL107 )

Corequisite: None

BIOL213 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An introduction to geographic information systems (GIS) with emphasis on capturing, storing, editing, querying, displaying, and analyzing geographically referenced data. Lecture and laboratory materials are designed to provide students with hands-on experience on real-world applications of GIS in their respective fields.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

BIOL215 Basic Microbiology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 4 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 4 sh]

Introduces clinical nursing students to the biology, metabolism, classifications, ecology, genetics and evolution of microbes. Emphasis is placed on the role of bacteria in human health and disease, control of microbial growth, and antimicrobial resistance. The laboratory includes techniques in handling, isolation, cultivation, staining, identification, and control of microorganisms. Intended for students in the Nursing program and will not satisfy a core requirement for a BS degree in Biology.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

BIOL220 DNA Methods in Biology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 1 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 1 sh]

An overview of the uses of DNA-based methods in modern biology, such as forensic identification of humans and animals, species determination, parentage testing, medical diagnostics, and evolutionary biology. Topics include the history of DNA analyses, collection/preservation of DNA samples, DNA typing and sequencing applications, and DNA databases.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL106 AND BIOL107 )

Corequisite:   None

BIOL225 Human Genetics

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An overview of the basic principles of Mendelian genetics, cytogenetics, molecular genetics, and population genetics with a focus on the mechanisms of human inheritance and disease. Restricted to Health Science majors. Does not satisfy biology elective credits for Biology majors, Biology/Chemistry majors or Biology minors. Does not satisfy natural science general education requirements.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL106 AND BIOL107 AND CHEM121 )

Corequisite:   None

BIOL240 Zoology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A survey of the animal kingdom with emphasis on evolutionary relationships within, between, and among constituent phyla. Lectures emphasize diversity, comparative anatomy, functional morphology, physiology, life history, ecology, and evolution. Laboratories emphasize and provide support for lecture concepts and comprise microscope analysis and gross animal dissection.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL106 AND BIOL107 )

Corequisite:  None

BIOL245 Marine Invertebrates

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

Designed to utilize the marine invertebrate taxa to introduce students to the unique specializations that animals have evolved which allow them to successfully carry out the processes necessary for life and to exploit a wide variety of marine habitats. Major trends in invertebrate evolution will be used to illustrate the historical constraints upon these solutions and the necessity of narrative explanations of form and function in animals. It is assumed that each student has been introduced to the major taxa of animals in a prior introductory zoology course. Taxonomy will be used as a heuristic tool, but will not be stressed as a separate subject. This class will be taught during summer session at the Wallops Island Campus of the Marine Science Consortium by faculty from various member universities.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL106 AND BIOL107 AND BIOL240 )

Corequisite:   None

BIOL250 Wetlands Ecology
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]
An overview of the essential role of wetlands in ecological systems. Because wetlands are transitional between aquatic and terrestrial systems, they require an interdisciplinary approach to be fully understood. This class will be taught during summer session at the Wallops Island Campus of the Marine Science Consortium by faculty from various member universities.-

Prerequisite: ( BIOL106 AND BIOL107 )

Corequisite:   None

BIOL300 Plant Physiology
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
This course presents a treatment of central topics in modern plant physiology. Topics will include: plant-cell biology, ion transport, water relations, translocations, respiration, photosynthesis, mineral nutrition, nitrogen metabolism, plant hormones, senescence and abscission, stress physiology, and photomorphogenesis. Laboratory exercises are designed to demonstrate physiological processes in plants and introduce basic and advanced techniques used in plant physiological research.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL106 AND BIOL107 AND BIOL206 AND CHEM120 AND CHEM121 )

Corequisite: None

BIOL301 Behavior of Marine Organisms

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Concepts of ethology; discussion and observation of the influences of external and internal factors on the regulation and control of behavior of organisms living in the marine coastal environment. This class will be taught during summer session at the Wallops Island Campus of the Marine Science Consortium by faculty from various member universities.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL106 AND BIOL107 )

Corequisite:   None

BIOL302 Developmental Biology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A study of classic embryology as well as relevant findings in cytogenetics, cell and molecular biology, and biochemistry, as it relates to structural and functional changes in molecules, cells, tissues, and organs during developmental cycles of plants and animals. Labs will include developmental study of living organisms as well as the study of prepared stages of development.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL106 AND BIOL107 AND BIOL202 )

Corequisite:   None

BIOL303 Vertebrate Endocrinology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 2 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 2 sh]

A survey courses of the major endocrine systems in vertebrates. An introduction to the chemistry and cellular mechanisms of action of different hormones is followed by in-depth discussions of the physiological effects of hormones. Topics include hypothalamic-pituitary interactions, reproduction, growth, osmoregulation, digestion and metabolism, and stress. Mammalian endocrinology is emphasized with discussion of important species differences in endocrine systems.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL106 AND BIOL107 AND BIOL202 ) OR ( BIOL106 AND BIOL107 AND BIOL240 )

Corequisite:   None

BIOL305 Ichthyology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

This course is an introduction to the study of evolution, taxonomy and morphology of fishes. Emphasis is placed on biodiversity, morphology, and conservation of fishes. Lecture topics include the nomenclature, history and techniques of both ichthyology and fisheries biology. Laboratory emphasis will be on identification, dissection, and the standard techniques used in field collections.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL106 AND BIOL107 AND BIOL240 )

Corequisite:   None

BIOL309 Ecology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An introduction to ecology. Emphasis is placed on evolutionary and classic ecology and effects of human society on natural systems. Topics include energy flow, nutrient recycling, and their influence on the distribution and abundance of organisms. Population studies include genetics, growth, age structure, density, and r and K selection.   Community topics include competitive interactions, species diversity, community similarity, and keystone species. Field data collection and statistical techniques for data interpretation are treated in laboratory.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL106 AND BIOL107 )

Corequisite:   None

BIOL310 Immunology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 2 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 2sh ]

An introduction to innate and adaptive immunity. The development, function and interaction of cellular and humoral components of the immune system will be discussed. The implications of infection, transplants, cancer, and allergies in immunocompetent individuals will be included along with immunopathologies such as autoimmunity and immunodeficiency.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL202 ) OR ( BIOL225 )

Corequisite:   None

BIOL312 Marine Botany
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]
This course is the study of the primary producers of the ocean, estuaries and terrestrial margins. This includes the study of phytoplankton, benthic macropytes, salt marsh macrophytes, and other edge communities like salt flats, mangroves and dunes. Although taxonomy will be important, it is not the sole focus of the course. Plant physiology and ecology will be stressed. The laboratory portion of the course will stress practical methods of measurement of the plants and their environment. This includes voucher production and specimen preservation, basic physical and chemical methods of abiotic environment measurement, growth and constituent analysis of plant tissue, chlorophyll analysis and wet and dry weight determination for biomass. This class will be taught during summer sessions at the Wallops Island Campus of the Marine Science Consortium by faculty from various member universities.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL106 AND BIOL107 AND BIOL206 AND CHEM120 )

Corequisite:   None

BIOL315 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
Introduction to the study of the comparative anatomy of the Vertebrata.   Emphasis is on form and function of the vertebrate classes with respect to each other and with respect to other subphyla, especially cephalochordates, within the phylum Chordata. The evolution of structure and function of the vertebrate classes is considered on a system by system basis. Comparative dissections of specimens from selected vertebrate classes will be carried out.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL106 AND BIOL107 )

Corequisite: None

BIOL317 Mycology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A detailed examination of mushrooms, molds, and human mycoses, including an introduction to fungal ecology and assessment of fungal classification, as well as molecular systematics and an overview of medical significance. The course utilizes hands-on student-driven, inquiry-based practices. Students will use scientific processes and procedures, data analysis, and research tools to investigate fungal morphogenesis, molecular diagnostics, culture techniques, ecological relationships, and human pathogenesis.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL202 AND CHEM121 )

Corequisite:   None

BIOL321 Marine Molecular Technology: Applications for Management and Forensics

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Students will gain an overview of modern molecular technology and how it can be applied to the management of marine organisms and the forensics field. The laboratory component will allow students to learn some of the most widely used techniques and instrumentation in the molecular field.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL106 AND BIOL107 )

Corequisite:   None

BIOL323 Bioinformatics and Genomics

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Introduces students to the recent technological advances in the life sciences that allow DNA sequencing of entire genomes, as well as analysis of the gene products of whole genomes simultaneously in one experiment. Topics include the structure and mechanics of the eukaryotic genome, transcriptome, and proteome in detail, with emphasis on hands-on exercises using public databases and software to extract, analyze and manipulate DNA and protein sequences.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL202 )

Corequisite:   None

BIOL328 Science Seminar

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

This seminar fulfills the natural and mathematical science seminar requirement in general education for the Bachelor of Arts degree; it does not fulfill biology majors course requirements but may be selected as a general education elective by biology majors. Topics studied each semester vary, but have included selected readings on ethics in science, evolution, genetics and genetic engineering, behavior, the brain, physiology, medicine and the world's environment. Assigned readings are used as a starting point for further student research and presentations. The interrelationships of biology with other disciplines such as economics, political science, and history are considered. A primary goal of this seminar is to increase the student’s exposure to some contemporary topics of biology.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

BIOL330 Cellular & Molecular Biology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 4 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 4 sh]

An in-depth study of the chemicals, organelles, and molecular genetics, and mechanisms of cellular function. Laboratory experiments give theoretical and hands-on experience in advanced molecular techniques, such as gel electrophoresis, DNA isolation, restriction digestion, DNA purity and quantification, bacterial transformation, Southern blotting, probe hybridization and detection, and PCR.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL202 )

Corequisite:   None

BIOL340 Microbiology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 4 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 4sh ]

A study of the anatomy, physiology, and taxonomy of microorganisms with a primary emphasis on prokaryotes. The laboratory component provides critical hands-on experience in standard bacteriological techniques involving the handling, cultivation, isolation, and identification of microorganisms. Additional emphasis will be placed on the role of bacteria, viruses, and other microorganisms in environmental and public health issues.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL106 AND BIOL107 AND BIOL202 AND CHEM121 ) OR ( BIOL106 AND BIOL107 AND BIOL225 AND CHEM121 )

Corequisite:   None

BIOL345 Advanced DNA Methods
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]
Prepares students for research and DNA forensics careers by presenting the theory and methods associated with characterizing organisms using modern DNA-based methods such as genotyping and sequencing. The laboratory techniques in this class can be used for human identification, species verification, parentage testing, and evolutionary research. Laboratory exercises and lectures cover sample preparation, PCR, theory and operation of the ABI 310 Genetic Analyzer, interpretation of results, and troubleshooting.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL202 ) OR ( BIOL330 )

Corequisite:   None

BIOL400 Ecology of Marine Plankton
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
A study of the phytoplankton and zooplankton in marine and brackish environments. In laboratory qualitative and quantitative comparisons will be made between the planktonic populations of various types of habitats in relation to primary and secondary productivity. This class will be taught during summer session at the Wallops Island Campus of the Marine Science Consortium by faculty from various member universities.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL106 AND BIOL107 AND BIOL309 )

Corequisite: None

BIOL402 Biological Evolution

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Intended for students interested in examining in detail the phenomenon of biological evolution. Although topics such as Cultural Evolution and Creationism will be considered briefly, the focus of this offering will be evolution as manifest in natural, biological systems. Topics to be presented via lecture and student presentation will include Population Genetics, Darwinism, Natural Selection, Sexual Selection and Altruism, Molecular Evolution, Human Origins and Evolution and Extinction.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL202 )

Corequisite:   None

BIOL403 Coral Reef Ecology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A study of coral reef structure, formation, types, and the relationships of reef organisms to their environment. Emphasis is given to species diversity, identification, symbioses, and effects of temperature, salinity, light, nutrient concentration, predation, and competition on the abundance and distribution of coral reef organisms. This class will be taught during summer sessions at the Wallops Island Campus of the Marine Science Consortium by faculty from various member universities.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL106 AND BIOL107 )

Corequisite:   None

BIOL405 Field Ecology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An advanced study of terrestrial community ecology including interactions between animal and plant populations. Special emphasis will be placed on standard techniques for estimating population size of various taxa, sampling plant community structure and statistical analysis and written interpretation of data.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL309 )

Corequisite:   None

BIOL409 Ornithology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A study of identification of birds in the field, by study skins and by song. It includes study of basic bird biology, evolution, natural history, ecology, research methodologies, biodiversity and conservation.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL106 AND BIOL107 )

Corequisite:   None

BIOL410 Organismal Physiology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A study of homeostatic mechanisms and systems in organisms and their relation to fundamental chemical and physical events in cells. Topics such as bioenergetics, osmoregulation, movement, and information processing are discussed as they relate to the function of organisms.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL106 AND BIOL107 AND CHEM121 )

Corequisite:   None

BIOL411 Aquatic Biology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

Flora and fauna of fresh water ecosystems. Emphasis on the biotic, physical and chemical characteristics of lotic and lentic systems and how these may affect abundance, distribution, and evolution within aquatic communities. Ecological effects of water pollution and some possible solutions for our increasing world problems. Laboratory will stress use of keys, field methods of water analysis, and applied techniques of individual scientific research.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL106 AND BIOL107 AND CHEM121 )

Corequisite:   None

BIOL413 Entomology
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]
A broadly balanced introduction to the insect world including structure and function, life cycles, habits, reproduction and development, disease relationships and agricultural implications. Students will be expected to collect and identify insect specimens.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL106 AND BIOL107 )

Corequisite:   None

BIOL415 Environmental Policy & Regulations
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
A review of significant United States Federal and Pennsylvania legislation and regulations pertinent to the study, protection and management of our biological resources. The legislation and rulemaking processes relevant to environmental issues will be investigated. The biological basis for resource management decisions and the role of the scientist in advocating, writing and implementing environmental legislation and regulations will be examined in detail.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL309 )

Corequisite: None

BIOL421 Marine Mammals

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A study of the distribution, population ecology, behavior, physiology and adaptations of marine mammals. Student projects will entail collecting physiological and behavioral data at field sites and at facilities studying marine mammals.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL106 AND BIOL107 )

Corequisite:   None

BIOL422 Biological Oceanography

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Investigates the interactions among ocean communities (planktonic, benthic and nektonic) and the marine environment (chemical and physical). The effects of the environment on the distribution and abundance of marine organisms as well as their effect on the environment are emphasized. This class will be taught during summer sessions at the Wallops Island Campus of the Marine Science Consortium by faculty from various member universities.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL106 AND BIOL107 )

Corequisite:   None

BIOL425 Environmental Toxicology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An introduction to environmental toxicology and an interdisciplinary study of the major classes of pollutants as well as ecotoxicology testing methods. Focus is on the effects of environmental toxins on living organisms and the ecosystem.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL309 AND CHEM205 ) OR ( BIOL309 AND CHEM220 )

Corequisite:   None

BIOL440 Environmental Microbiology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Provides a fundamental knowledge base of general microbiology, microbial ecology, and specific microbial processes essential to many sub-disciplines of environmental microbiology. Through intensive discussions, applied research investigations, and hands-on laboratory- and field-based experiences, students will be introduced to a variety of topics that are central to understanding microbial diversity and microbial evolution.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL340 AND CHEM205 ) OR ( BIOL340 AND CHEM220 )

Corequisite:   None

BIOL450 Biology Senior Seminar

[Minimum Semester Hours: 1 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 1 sh]

A discussion-based course in which students read and critically evaluate journal articles, then present seminars and lead discussions on the articles. Students are also required to submit a research proposal on a topic agreed upon with the instructor. Themes and topics will vary with the instructor.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

BIOL628 Science Seminar

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

Topics studied each semester vary, but have included selected readings on ethics in science, evolution, genetics and genetic engineering, behavior, the brain, physiology, medicine and the world's environment. Assigned readings are used as a starting point for further student research and presentations. The interrelationship of biology with other disciplines such as economics, political science, and history are considered. A primary goal of this seminar is to increase the student’s exposure to some contemporary topics of biology. Additional coursework will be required for graduate level.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

TOP
©