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CHEM101 Chemistry in the Environment
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]
Designed to provide students with an introduction to chemical principles as they apply to important issues in everyday life. The American Chemical Society program Chemistry in Context serves as the basis. The laboratory experience emphasizes the scientific method and is designed to reinforce the topics from the lecture. Students make real world measurements as part of investigations of their environment and the applications of chemistry to their lives. Designed for students who have had no or limited high school chemistry.   Does not satisfy requirements for a natural science major or minor. Fulfills General Education Requirements.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

CHEM103 The Chemistry of Art
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
Explore the intersection of chemistry with the visual arts. Basic principles of chemistry will be applied to the topics of color, paint, paper, clay, glass, metals, photography, and art restoration. Important chemical concepts and safety concerns will be investigated to learn how to properly handle art materials. Introduces the chemical and physical properties. Laboratory investigation will reveal how these properties change when substances are mixed.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite: None

CHEM105 Forensic Chemistry

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An introduction to chemical principles as they apply to forensic investigations. By applying the scientific method to these basic principles, students will investigate the role of chemistry in solving crimes. The laboratory experience is designed to reinforce the scientific method and the topics from the lecture. Students make real world determinations as they investigate and apply chemistry to their lives. Meets general education lab science requirement, except for a natural science major or minor.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

CHEM110 Basic Chemistry (3.0 sh)

Introduces chemical principles as they apply to important issues in everyday life and incorporates chemical principles and problem solving into examples to help students gain an understanding of scientific and technological aspects of the contemporary world.  Topics may include the properties of matter, atomic theory, chemical bonding, molecular structure, and types of chemical reactions.

Prerequisites:  MATH100

CHEM111 Chemistry of Nutrition

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An introduction to the chemistry of nutrition emphasizing nutrients and their interactions in the body. The chemical composition, energy value and by-products of food elements and water will be related to the needs of the human system. Nutrition will be studied not only from the point of view of how to get the necessities of life, but also what effect they have on the human being.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

CHEM120 Principles of Chemistry 1

[Minimum Semester Hours: 4 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 4 sh]

The first of two semesters of a standard general chemistry sequence. Topics include measurement and dimensional analysis, atomic and molecular structure, mole and stoichiometry calculations, gas laws, thermochemistry, introductory quantum mechanics, electron configuration and periodicity. The chemistry laboratory work is introductory in nature and follows several of the lecture topics.

Prerequisite: ( MATH112 ) OR ( MATH141 ) OR ( MATH142 ) OR ( MATH113 )

Corequisite:   None

CHEM121 Principles of Chemistry 2

[Minimum Semester Hours: 4 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 4 sh]

The second of two semesters of a standard general chemistry sequence. Topics include solids and liquids, solutions and solubility, kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, spontaneity and free energy, electrochemistry and nuclear chemistry. The chemistry laboratory work is introductory in nature and follows several of the lecture topics. Qualitative analysis is included as part of the laboratory experience.

Prerequisite: ( CHEM120 )

Corequisite:   None

CHEM205 Introduction Organic Chemistry

[Minimum Semester Hours: 4 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 4 sh]

An introduction to the subject of organic chemistry for students in majors that need some basic knowledge of organic chemistry. This course uses an integrated approach to the chemistry of organic compounds and emphasizes a problem-solving approach to the subject. Many examples of biologically important molecules will be used. The laboratory segment of the course introduces the student to the physical and chemical properties of organic compounds, the techniques used to separate and purify organic compounds, the synthesis of selected organic compounds, and the identification of unknowns by their physical and chemical behavior. Proper handling of chemicals is stressed throughout the course.

Prerequisite: ( CHEM121 )

Corequisite:   None

CHEM220 Organic Chemistry 1

[Minimum Semester Hours: 4 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 4sh ]

An integrated course covering the properties, reactions, and preparations of both aliphatic and aromatic compounds from the functional group approach. Explanations given in terms of mechanisms, rearrangements, stereochemistry, and energy diagrams. Lab consists of introduction to techniques of separation, some representative preparations including a sequence, and the identification of unknowns by their chemical behavior.

Prerequisite: ( CHEM121 )

Corequisite:   None

CHEM221 Organic Chemistry 2
[Minimum Semester Hours: 4 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 4sh ]
CHEM221 is a continuation of CHEM220. Relies heavily on concepts and laboratory techniques learned in CHEM220. Students are encouraged to derive from CHEM220 the fundamental concepts underlying the reactions, mechanisms and synthesis of organic compounds presented in CHEM221. The chemistry of carbonyl compounds and aromatic compounds is emphasized. Laboratory experiments emphasize the identification of unknowns by their physical and chemical behavior and the synthesis of organic compounds. Design of experimental procedure will be stressed.

Prerequisite: ( CHEM220 )

Corequisite:   None

CHEM301 Inorganic Chemistry
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
An introduction to fundamental concepts of inorganic chemistry including atomic and molecular structure, bonding theories, group theory, coordination chemistry and descriptive chemistry of the elements.

Prerequisite: ( CHEM221 )

Corequisite: None

CHEM302 Introduction to Computational Chemistry

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An introduction to the field of computational chemistry including molecular mechanical, semi-empirical, ab initio wavefunction, and density functional modeling of chemical systems. This course enables students to use computational chemistry in their studies and to be critical consumers of computational chemistry results in scientific literature.

Prerequisite: ( CHEM221 AND MATH141 )

Corequisite:   (CHEM221 ANDPHYS131 ) OR (CHEM221 ANDPHYS171 )

CHEM316 Quantitative Analysis

[Minimum Semester Hours: 4 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 4 sh]

An introduction to statistical analysis of experimental data, validation of analytical methods, gravimetric analysis, potentiometric measurements, and electrodes. An advanced examination of stoichiometric calculations, chemical equilibrium, acid-base equilibria, acid-base titrations, and complexometric reactions/titrations. Laboratory experimentation involves titrations, gravimetric analysis, electrochemical measurements, and statistical analysis.

Prerequisite: ( CHEM121 )

Corequisite:   None

CHEM317 Instrumental Analysis

[Minimum Semester Hours: 4 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 4 sh]

Fundamentals of spectroscopy, chromatography, electrochemistry, and mass spectrometry. Lecture topics include data treatment, data interpretation, theory of the underlying principles, and basic operating principles. Special attention is given to how these techniques are used to solve analytical problems, examples being taken from other areas of science. Laboratory experiments focus on the operation, maintenance, and optimization of instrumentation and interpretation of laboratory data

Prerequisite: ( CHEM316 ) OR ( CHEM421 )

Corequisite:   None

CHEM320 Physical Chemistry 1

[Minimum Semester Hours: 4 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 4 sh]

A study of the content and transfer of energy in physical and chemical reactions. The laws of thermodynamics, and the concepts of work, enthalpy, entropy, and free energy are defined and given in a detailed quantitative treatment. The course also provides a detailed introduction to the topics of kinetics and reaction dynamics. The laboratory portion of the course is designed to provide students experience with a broad range of the topics covered during the course.

Prerequisite: ( CHEM220 AND MATH141 AND PHYS130 ) OR ( CHEM220 AND MATH141 AND PHYS170 )

Corequisite:   (CHEM316 ANDPHYS131 ) OR (CHEM316 ANDPHYS171 )

CHEM321 Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy

[Minimum Semester Hours: 4 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 4 sh]

An exploration of the application of quantum mechanics to understanding chemical phenomena, with special emphasis on chemical structure and spectroscopy.

Prerequisite: ( MATH142 AND PHYS171 ) OR ( MATH142 AND PHYS131 )

Corequisite:   (CHEM221 )

CHEM328 Science Seminar

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

This seminar explores various topics in chemistry. Specific topic selection is based on the expertise and interest of the faculty.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

CHEM330 Chemical Literature
[Minimum Semester Hours: 1 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 1sh ]
Introduces students to important library resources in chemical research (i.e. handbooks, reviews, monographs, compendiums and abstracts). Emphasis will be given to development of systematic library search strategies and information retrieval from library resources. Special emphasis will be given to instruction in the hands-on use of computerized scientific databases. Pre- or Co-requisite: CHEM221 or permission of instructor.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   (CHEM221 )

CHEM350 Polymer Chemistry
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
Major topics in polymer chemistry will be examined. Structure, synthesis, characterization, properties, and uses of polymers will be discussed. Much of the focus will be on polymers used or produced in industry.

Prerequisite: ( CHEM221 )

Corequisite: None

CHEM404 Spectroscopic Methods of Molecular Structure Determination

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Focuses on the interpretation of spectral data. Theory of each spectroscopic method, sample preparation, instrumentation and applications of each method will also be discussed. Problems will be presented in class to demonstrate logical approaches to solving spectral problems. Student in-class problems will be used to generate open discussion. Spectral problems will be used to reinforce concepts and approaches to determining the structure of unknowns. Examples from both organic and inorganic chemistry will be used.

Prerequisite: ( CHEM320 )

Corequisite:   (CHEM321 )

CHEM410 Biochemistry

[Minimum Semester Hours: 4 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 4 sh]

Provides an introduction to modern biochemistry at the molecular level. Emphasis will be given to the structure and function of the major classes of biomolecules (proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids) and the bioenergetics of metabolic pathways. The laboratory portion will include the application of modern biochemical methods of analysis to the problems of:   purification and characterization of biomolecules, quantitative measurement of enzyme activities, and the evaluation of metabolic processes.

Prerequisite: ( CHEM221 ) OR ( CHEM205 )

Corequisite:   None

CHEM415 Biochemistry 2

[Minimum Semester Hours: 4 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 4 sh]

Presents an overview of the metabolic transformations of fatty acids and the complex lipids, amino acids and the purine and pyrimidine nucleotides. Emphasis will be given to biological synthesis of the building blocks of the major classes of biomolecules. The course will also provide an introduction to cellular signaling and specialized topics in biochemistry. The laboratory portion will expand on the techniques learned in first semester with application to independent/small group projects.

Prerequisite: ( CHEM410 )

Corequisite:   None

CHEM430 Advanced Organic Chemistry

[Minimum Semester Hours: 4 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 4 sh]

An in-depth study of organic chemistry with major emphasis on physical aspects as applied to syntheses, spectroscopy, structure elucidation, and reaction mechanisms. The laboratory component will emphasize advanced experimental techniques used in synthesis, mechanism elucidation, and the characterization of organic compounds.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

CHEM440 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

[Minimum Semester Hours: 4 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 4 sh]

Examines major topics in theoretical and descriptive inorganic chemistry including acid-base chemistry, oxidation and reduction, chemistry of transition metals, organometallic chemistry, catalysis, inorganic clusters, solid state and bioinorganic chemistry.   The laboratory component of this course emphasizes experimental techniques in the synthesis and characterization of inorganic compounds.

Prerequisite: ( CHEM301 )

Corequisite:   None

CHEM628 Science Seminar

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

This seminar explores various topics in chemistry. Specific topic selection is based on the expertise and interest of the faculty.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

CHIN101 Chinese 1
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]
An introduction to the basics of the foreign language in question; the course is especially designed for students who wish to spend a semester at a university in a country where the language is spoken. The primary emphasis of the course will be on developing basic listening, reading and speaking skills in the language and increasing the students' awareness of the foreign culture.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

CHIN102 Chinese 2
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
The study of the foreign language in question, building on the material learned in the level I course. Especially designed for students who wish to improve their basic knowledge of the language in order to be able to study at the foreign university that supplied the instructor (completion of this course followed by a semester of study abroad at the university will satisfy the foreign language requirement).

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite: None

CHIN201 Chinese 3

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

The study of the foreign language in question, building upon the material learned in the Level 2 course and especially designed for students who wish to enhance their knowledge of that language.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

CHIN202 Chinese 4

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

The study of the foreign language in question, building upon the material learned in the Level 1, 2 and 3 courses and especially designed for students who wish to enhance their knowledge of that language.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

COMM100 Introduction to Communication

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A study of the process of communication on the personal, group, and mass levels.   Survey and analysis of the basic communication process and techniques as applied to various communication situations. Consideration of both the art and technical aspects of communication. Meets general education speech requirement.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

COMM102 Fundamentals of Public Speaking

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Designed to develop the study and performance of speech as a means of communication, self-expression, and social control in a diverse society while incorporating theory and techniques of speaking and listening into a variety of speech activities. Fulfills General Education Requirements.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

COMM103 Small Group Communication

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

The theory and practice of small group communication. Students learn the techniques of how to lead a discussion and how to participate in a discussion. The topics of discussion are chosen primarily from current events. Fulfills General Education Requirements.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

COMM104 Interpersonal Communication

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

Covers the cognitive, the affective and the skill levels involved in the interpersonal communication process. Fulfills General Education Requirements.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

COMM110 Speech for Foreign Students
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]
Designed to enhance the speech of students for who English is a second language. Through speaking activities, both in and out of class, students focus on naturalizing their spoken English to a more understandable and useful tool of communication. Emphasis is placed on neutralizing non-English pronunciation, melody pattern and phonation.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

COMM119 First Year Seminar for Communication Students
[Minimum Semester Hours: 1 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 1 sh]
Introduces communication majors to the university learning environment and their chosen program of study. Students will learn about the requirements of the Communication program, internships options, career paths, and the competencies and professional behaviors expected of professionals in the field. The course also covers specific learning strategies, classroom technologies, and institutional resources that might help them achieve their goals.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite: None

COMM150 Intro Mass Communication

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Survey of the American mass media with emphasis on historical development, economic structure, organization, function and effects in society today. The course is a core requirement for all Communication majors.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

COMM190 Writing for the Mass Media

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Examines basic principles of effective journalistic composition, emphasizing in particular the development and organization of ideas relevant to news events and the expression of those ideas in clear expository prose. Students will read a variety of prose models and write a specified number of news articles. The news writing process includes researching, interviewing, drafting, revising, and submissions in a timely fashion.

Prerequisite: ( ENGL100 ) OR ( HONR111 )

Corequisite:   None

COMM200 Voice and Articulation

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Improvement of the physical act of speaking through work on diction, projection, vocal quality, pitch, and time factors. Physiological, phonetic, and psychological foundations considered. Students will be introduced to the rudiments of the international phonetic alphabet. Individual and group activities are an integral part of this course. Class attendance is a critical part of the successful completion of this course.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

COMM202 Supervised Communication Practicum

[Minimum Semester Hours: 1 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 6 sh]

The primary focus is upon pre-professional communication praxis. Close supervision by journalism and mass communication faculty members is required to ensure a high quality field experience.

Prerequisite: ( COMM190 )

Corequisite:   None

COMM205 Computer-Mediated Writing

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Students will use techniques of computer word-processing and other applications to compose sophisticated written documents. Primary focus is on using computers to improve design, composition, editing, and revision skills.

Prerequisite: ( CISC150 AND ENGL100 ) OR ( CISC150 AND HONR111 )

Corequisite:   None

COMM208 Communication Theory

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

Surveys dominant theories in interpersonal, group, public, and mass communication. Emphasis is placed on both establishing frameworks that provide a contest for each theory and demonstrating how theories help illustrate the process of communication in applied settings.

Prerequisite: ( COMM100 ) OR ( COMM102 ) OR ( COMM103 ) OR ( COMM104 )

Corequisite:   None

COMM210 Gender and the Mass Media
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]
Explores significant issues and representational practices in the relationship among women, men, and the mass media. Students will examine the sociological, psychological, historical, and cultural construction of gender and the influence of the media upon these processes.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

COMM215 Sports Broadcasting
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
Examination of the industry, history, practice, ethics and theory of sports broadcasting. Particular attention given to sportscasts, play-by-play and color commentaries and production techniques.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite: None

COMM220 Oral Interpretation

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Theory and techniques of oral interpretation. Class activities include selection, analysis, preparation and presentations of selections from prose fiction, drama and poetry.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

COMM240 Online Public Relations

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Examines new media technologies used to publish public relations information on the Internet. Primary foci are gathering data, constructing multi-media public relations releases, and publishing on a website documents with embedded audio and video. Students gain practical experience in delivering information electronically.

Prerequisite: ( COMM190 ) OR ( JOUR190 )

Corequisite:   None

COMM250 The Movies Look at the Media Professions

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Encourage students to think critically about the media professions - journalism, advertising, public relations, and the entertainment industries - by watching and analyzing movies about them. Students will compare these filmic representations with scholarly and critical readings that explore how media professionals and others view the work that they do.

Prerequisite: ( COMM150 )

Corequisite:   None

COMM290 News Reporting

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An introduction to the practical knowledge and skills used in reporting news. Students will build upon news writing skills developed in COMM190 by concentrating on the use of news gathering techniques, including research and interviewing.

Prerequisite: ( COMM190 )

Corequisite:   None

COMM292 Principles of Advertising

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A study of the psychology, sociology, economics, and philosophy of advertising with special reference to creative strategy, copywriting, and design service to advertising campaigns. The course also examines the role and impact of advertising on society.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

COMM295 Radio Journalism

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

The development of skills in reporting and writing for radio. Use of cassette and tape cartridge machines, and manual and electronic editing are introduced.

Prerequisite: ( COMM190 )

Corequisite:   None

COMM300 Organizational Communication
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]
Designed to examine verbal and written communication that occurs in organizations. Included in this focus are, among other topics, informal and formal methods of communication, power bases, leadership and corporate communication flow.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

COMM301 Listening and Conflict Management
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
Introduces students to concepts of listening and teaches them how to manage conflicts through a variety of effective methods. Students will develop skills involved in the listening process to increase their understanding of others' thoughts and feelings and gather accurate information. They will overcome barriers to effective listening and be able to provide more accurate responses to questions. Students study and broaden their own conflict management styles. Students learn the principles of mediation and negotiation.

Prerequisite: ( COMM102 ) OR ( COMM103 ) OR ( COMM104 )

Corequisite: None

COMM303 Argumentation & Debate

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Designed to improve analytical skills in construction of arguments and the debating skills of defending those arguments, and to develop the critical listening skills needed to analyze and evaluate the arguments of others. A study of the theories of argumentation and their practical application to debate.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

COMM304 Intercultural Communication

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Introduces verbal and non-verbal intercultural communication as they apply to a variety of cultures, including American subcultures. Discussion topics will include: the impact that cultural differences have on language, culture and communication, value differences, non-domestic cultures, verbal and non-verbal interaction. Students will investigate the implications of intercultural communication on business, education and tourism.

Prerequisite: ( COMM102 ) OR ( COMM103 ) OR ( COMM104 ) OR ( COMM110 ) OR ( COMM202 )

Corequisite:   None

COMM305 Television Criticism

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A survey of contemporary critical methods used to examine the aesthetic and sociological aspects of television. Extensive reading in critical literature is supplemented by analyses of selected television programs.

Prerequisite: ( COMM190 )

Corequisite:   None

COMM310 Television Journalism

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Introduces skills in reporting, writing, and assembling audio and visual material for television news. Students use tudio and field equipment to prepare, produce, and edit news and sports stories.

Prerequisite: ( COMM190 )

Corequisite:   None

COMM315 Corporate Video Production

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Introduction to the planning and production of video programs for business, industry, and nonprofit institutions. Through lecture, discussion and laboratory experiences, students learn to use video as a promotional tool in the business sector.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

COMM317 Radio Workshop

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

A workshop providing direct practical experience in radio. Develops skills in producing dramatic musical productions as well as commercials and Public Service Announcements.

Prerequisite: ( ENGL100 ) OR ( HONR111 )

Corequisite:   None

COMM318 Video Workshop
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]
Introduces principles and skills associated with effective television performance. The course emphasizes skills necessary for practicing television journalists and presenters.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

COMM320 Business Communication
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
Advanced practice in effective speaking and listening: reports and sales presentations, policy speeches, and conference leadership techniques employed in business and industry. Special attention is paid to the vital role management plays in developing, initiating and maintaining effective communication within the business/industrial setting.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite: None

COMM325 Film Today

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

This course will examine current and recent cinema, critically evaluating films of all kinds. These will include products of the American film industry, independent, documentary, and experimental films, films made for television and video-cassette, and foreign films released in this country.

Prerequisite: ( COMM150 )

Corequisite:   None

COMM328 Humanities Seminar

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A contextual or situational approach to communication studies with emphasis on investigation, analysis, and critique. Topics might include, among others, political rhetoric in a presidential election, communication in the workplace, current issues in cross-cultural communication, modern trends in relationship development, and forensic methods for educators.

Prerequisite: ( ENGL100 ) OR ( HONR111 )

Corequisite:   None

COMM330 Cultural Studies in Mass Communication

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An examination of the issues of access and representation in the mass media. Of central interest are the constraints and possibilities for change in the media industries’ structures, practices, and relationships with social change coalitions concerned about gender, race, ethnicity, class, sexual orientation, and other markers of cultural identity.

Prerequisite: ( COMM150 )

Corequisite:   None

COMM333 Public Relations

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

The nature and scope of public relations; the principles and techniques underlying the practice of public relations. Emphasis on the public relations practitioner as a communication specialist who explores and maintains channels of communication between organizations and the public.

Prerequisite: ( COMM102 ) OR ( COMM103 )

Corequisite:   None

COMM340 Advertising Design

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Advertisements that can be designed on a computer constitute the content of the course. Enticement, composition, and impact form the three theoretical areas upon which advertising design will focus.

Prerequisite: ( COMM190 )

Corequisite:   None

COMM345 Advanced Public Speaking

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

Advanced study of the theory and practice of oral discourse. Projects, assignments, and coursework designed to provide students with the opportunity to develop skills in oral communication beyond the level achieved in Fundamentals of Public Speaking.

Prerequisite: ( MCOM100 ) OR ( SPCH100 ) OR ( SPCH102 ) OR ( SPCH103 ) OR ( SPCH104 ) OR ( COMM100 ) OR ( COMM102 ) OR ( COMM103 ) OR ( COMM104 )

Corequisite:   None

COMM350 Introduction to Communication Research
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]
Focuses on the basics of research in the field of communication. Through reading, class discussion, lecture, exercises and assignments, students will explore how to write a professional, academic or business research proposal. In addition, students will critically analyze others' research.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

COMM355 Environmental Journalism
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
Presents the writing techniques students need to communicate simply and effectively for the media about science, environment, health and medical topics.

Prerequisite: ( COMM290 )

Corequisite: None

COMM360 Communication Analysis

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Analyzes the persuasion that impacts us all, often beneath the level of awareness. Students explore the process and purpose of analyzing and critiquing messages that affect social and political stability; self-fulfillment and personal happiness; and meaningful and healthy relationships. Students make connections between the rhetorical message and ideas such as quality, value, goodness, and rightness to ensure that the power of rhetoric is used competently.

Prerequisite: ( COMM1** ) OR ( COMM1** )

Corequisite:   None

COMM370 Topics in Communication

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A topical approach to applied communication practice designed to explore specialized knowledge and skills. Topics might include, among others, special events planning, gender and communication, digital video editing, and agricultural public relations.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

COMM375 Persuasion

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A study of the factors related to attitude-change through oral communication. General theories of persuasion and an introduction to modern experimental research in the area included.

Prerequisite: ( COMM102 ) OR ( COMM103 ) OR ( COMM104 ) OR ( COMM202 )

Corequisite:   None

COMM390 Feature Writing

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Focus is on writing issue-oriented features and personality profiles. Attention given to structure, style, and content of features and to various ways to begin and end features. Also discussed are techniques of fiction writing that can be applied to features.

Prerequisite: ( COMM190 AND ENGL100 ) OR ( COMM190 AND HONR111 )

Corequisite:   None

COMM391 Sports Writing

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A workshop providing direct practical experience in sports writing. Focus is on news gathering and writing techniques. Attention also given to ethics, business and financial aspects of sports, sports columns, investigative sports writing, sports features, and the history of sports writing.

Prerequisite: ( ENGL100 ) OR ( HONR111 )

Corequisite:   None

COMM392 Documentary Film

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

A study of the art and development of non-fiction film, examining the major documentary film movements and filmmakers.

Prerequisite: ( ENGL100 ) OR ( HONR111 )

Corequisite:   None

COMM393 News Editing
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]
Focus on editing copy and designing news pages for print and web. Attention given to the elements of typography, design, and computer usage in the news room.

Prerequisite: ( COMM190 )

Corequisite:   None

COMM394 Magazine Writing
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
A workshop providing direct practice experience in magazine writing. Researching, writing, and marketing professional magazine articles of various kinds.

Prerequisite: ( COMM190 )

Corequisite: None

COMM400 Communication Capstone Seminar

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Designed to use a workshop format to address communication theories, communication issues as they relate to the public, and practical applications. Students will read, discuss and analyze various communication theories, develop a major research project and a professional portfolio, and explore current issues affecting the industry, including the impact of emerging technologies and matters of professional ethics and responsibility. Topics will be addressed from the perspective of the student's major emphasis. Restricted to students who have completed 60 credits.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

COMM405 Communication and Responsibility

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Designed to explore the appropriate and effective use of words and actions as they affect our communication and relationships. We discuss theories and standards by which our communicative acts are chosen and evaluated. We discuss responsible communicative choices we make in order to refine our various communicative paradigms. Finally, this course can help communicators deal with the consequences that result from using language and nonverbal communication competently and ethically. Restricted to students who have completed 60 credits or permission of the instructor.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

COMM450 Opinion Writing

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Writing opinion in the form of editorials and reviews. For editorial writing, the course will use a critical thinking model to analyze social issues; for review writing, it will focus on aesthetic issues in various art forms.

Prerequisite: ( COMM190 )

Corequisite:   None

COMM488 Case Studies in Public Relations

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A case study approach to examine concrete public relations settings and situations that illustrate the possibilities and limitations of public relations effectiveness. Students explore the range of strategies that businesses, nonprofit organizations, and government agencies have adopted in varied circumstances and learn how to assess the practical and ethical implications of these strategic choices thus developing an effective public relations management perspective.

Prerequisite: ( ENGL100 ) OR ( HONR111 )

Corequisite:   None

COMM491 Propaganda and Public Opinion

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A detailed study of propaganda and public opinion from World War II to the present. Special emphasis is given to the media of propaganda. The course also focuses on propaganda strategies in industrial and non-industrial countries.

Prerequisite: ( ENGL100 ) OR ( HONR111 )

Corequisite:   None

COMM493 Online Journalism

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

Exams new media technologies used to communicate newsworthy information over the Internet. Primary foci are gathering data and constructing new forms of news. Students gain practical experience in delivering information electronically.

Prerequisite: ( COMM190 )

Corequisite:   None

COMM494 Communication Law & Ethics
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]
A detailed study of First Amendment law as it affects the press, and a survey of broadcast regulations. Students explore the relationships of law and ethics and examine and discuss ethical problems and practices.

Prerequisite: ( ENGL100 ) OR ( HONR111 )

Corequisite:   None

COMM495 Public Relations Writing
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
Writing news releases, annual reports, speeches, two-fold brochures, radio scripts, sports backgrounders, print advertisements, and political papers forms the center of this course. In addition, designing newsletters and fund raising packets is considered.

Prerequisite: ( ENGL100 ) OR ( HONR111 )

Corequisite: None

COMM496 Advertising Campaign Development

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Acquaints students with the major phases involved in the development of an advertising campaign, from market research, creative copy writing and advertising design, to media placement and the testing of advertising effectiveness. Students examine and critique specific advertising campaigns and construct a campaign for a specific client as a major course project.

Prerequisite: ( COMM292 )

Corequisite:   None

COMM605 Communication and Responsibility

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Designed to explore the appropriate and effective use of words and actions as they affect our communication and relationships. Discussion of theories and standards by which our communicative acts are chosen and evaluated. Will enable communicators to deal with the consequences that result from using language and nonverbal communication competently and ethically.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

COMM628 Humanities Seminar

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A thematic or topical approach to mass communication texts, practices, or policies, with emphasis on analysis, synthesis, and critique. Topics might include, among others, the media and terrorism, media effects and consequences, comparative study of international news processes, trends and issues in photojournalism, and media representations of disability, ethnicity and age.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

COMM630 Cultural Studies in Mass Communication

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An examination of the issues of access and representation in the mass media. Of central interest are the constraints and possibilities for change in the media industries’ structures, practices, and relationships with social change coalitions concerned about gender, race, ethnicity, class, sexual orientation, and other markers of cultural identity.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

COMM691 Propaganda & Public Opinion

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A detailed study of propaganda and public opinion from World War II to the present. Special emphasis is given to the media of propaganda. The course also focuses on propaganda strategies in industrial and non-industrial countries.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

COMM694 Communication Law & Ethics

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

A detailed study of First Amendment law as it affects the press, and a survey of broadcast regulations. Students explore the relationships of law and ethics and examine and discuss ethical problems and practices.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

COMP119 Freshman Seminar: Introduction to Computing and Problem Solving
[Minimum Semester Hours: 1 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]
The first year seminar is designed to introduce the student to the culture and mission of the university within the context of an academic discipline of choice. The course will explore the purpose of one's college education and provide the student an opportunity to become engaged with the academic field of interest. The student will be introduced to basic college learning and study skills in the context of the content area. Through ample class discussion of common readings, the student will engage in active learning. Common co-curricular activities and the incorporation of a peer mentor component will facilitate the first year student's connection with fellow students and faculty in the university community. Restricted to first semester, first year students.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

COMP150 Introduction to Computers
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
Provides an introduction to computing systems and their applications in modern society. It acquaints students with the organization and operation of computer systems. Students are introduced to a variety of applications such as word processing, spreadsheets, database management, and web development.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite: None

COMP160 Programming 1

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Provides an introduction to computing systems and computing facilities at Lock Haven University, and an overview of computer programming as a discipline and profession. Students study algorithm design and development using pseudo code. They implement algorithms using an Object Oriented high level programming language. The emphasis is on Classes, Objects, and Methods and topics include data types and storage, control structures, functions, arrays and files. This course will also provide an introduction to Object Oriented Design of Software and generic Integrated Development Environment.

Prerequisite: ( MATH112 ) OR ( MATH113 ) OR ( MATH141 )

Corequisite:   None

COMP161 Programming 2

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Continuation of Programming I providing intermediate to advanced programming techniques in the programming language introduced in Programming I. Emphasis is placed on object-oriented techniques and modular design as well as algorithm design involving library objects, advanced techniques for input and output (I/O) and exception handling, and elementary data structures.

Prerequisite: ( COMP160 )

Corequisite:   None

COMP200 Fundamentals of Networking

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Introduces fundamentals of computer networks and the Internet. The TCP/IP protocol stack is introduced and concepts are discussed.   Application layer protocols used for FTP, Web and email access, DNS etc are studied using network surveillance tools. Transport layer protocols TCP and UDP are investigated. Students learn the concept of IP address assignment, Router configuration and the physical layer. This course will introduce the students to the workings of the Internet Engineering Task Force and the standardization process.

Prerequisite: ( CISC150 ) OR ( COMP119 ) OR ( CISC119 ) OR ( COMP150 )

Corequisite:   None

COMP202 Introduction to Computer Systems Administration

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Focuses on the installation, administration and use of software including a variety of operating systems, virtual machines, disk partitions and file management, application installation, OpenOffice, editors, scheduling task, backup and recovery, and basic scripting for automation of tasks. Additionally, students will acquire introductory knowledge of hardware requirements and components including CPUs, RAM, disk, flash, video and Networking.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   (COMP160 )

COMP205 Web-Based Application Development

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A survey of business application development using web-based technologies.

Prerequisite: ( COMP160 )

Corequisite:   None

COMP220 Contemporary Issues in Computing

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

An examination of the legal, social, and ethical issues that arise from the use of technology and the responsibilities that all technology users, including computer scientists, have with regard to these developments.

Prerequisite: ( COMP150 ) OR ( CISC150 ) OR ( COMP160 )

Corequisite:   None

COMP225 Mobile Application Development
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]
Introduces the tools and techniques used to develop software applications for mobile devices and platforms. The course will examine topics such as user interface design, application portability, web protocols, sofware services, security and accessibility. The course will emphasize hands-on development using Google's Android platform.

Prerequisite: ( COMP161 )

Corequisite:   None

COMP230 Discrete Structures and Formal Languages
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
Provides the theoretical computer science foundation to support the success of the computing student. This course includes a study of algorithms, graphs, trees, Boolean expressions, logic networks, adn formal models of computation.

Prerequisite: ( COMP160 AND MATH107 )

Corequisite: None

COMP240 Game Programming

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Provides a continuation of the concepts introduced in Programming I from the perspective of 2D game programming. Emphasis is placed on object-oriented techniques and modular design. Common algorithms used in game design are introduced, with a focus on utilizing the data structures and generics provided by the Java standard runtime library. Quality assurance, concurrent programming, even-driven programming, and graphical user interface programming are also covered.

Prerequisite: ( COMP161 )

Corequisite:   None

COMP250 Advanced Microcomputer Applications

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Teaches students how to use personal productivity software (including but not limited to word processors, spreadsheets, and databases),to collect data, manage data, analyze data, solve problems and effectively communicate results.

Prerequisite: ( COMP150 AND MATH107 ) OR ( CISC150 AND MATH107 )

Corequisite:   None

COMP255 Database Design

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Introduces students to database design at the enterprise level. Coverage includes the development of logical and conceptual models, translation into the internal model using Structured Query Language (SQL), and creation of database queries.

Prerequisite: ( CISC250 ) OR ( COMP160 ) OR ( COMP250 )

Corequisite:   None

COMP260 Information Technology Project Management

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Introduces fundamentals of project management using both concept and application. A generic Information Technology Project Methodology (ITPM) is used. The nine areas of the Project Management Institute's Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) are incorporated.

Prerequisite: ( ACCT110 AND CISC250 AND MANG101 ) OR ( ACCT110 AND COMP250 AND MANG101 )

Corequisite:   None

COMP300 Data Structures and Algorithms

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Introduces the fundamental concepts of data structures, abstractions for organizing and processing data, and the algorithms that evolve from them. Topics include basic data structure types (including stacks, queues, linked lists, hash tables, trees, heaps and graphs) and their applications, algorithms for searching and sorting, the use of object and generic programming techniques for implementation, algorithm analysis and algorithm design strategies including recursion and greedy approaches.

Prerequisite: ( COMP161 )

Corequisite:   None

COMP302 C/C++ for Systems Programming

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

Introduces students to C and C++ and includes both procedural and object-oriented programming. Emphasis is placed on the use of Application Programming Interfaces (API) for use with systems, network, and graphics applications.

Prerequisite: ( COMP161 )

Corequisite:   None

COMP304 Data and Computer Communications
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]
Introduces the student to communications architectures used in the Business and the Services Industry. The network is viewed from an end-to-end perspective as a system of cooperating functional blocks. Covers Public Switched Telephone Network, Voice over IP, Wireless Wide Area Networks, Satellite communications and WAN/MAN technologies using MPLS. Security frameworks, Network Management and protocol vulnerability are topics covered in this course. The student is also introduced to optimization techniques, accounting issues and capacity analysis.

Prerequisite: ( CISC200 ) OR ( COMP200 )

Corequisite:   None

COMP305 Database Application Development
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
Introduces the study of development of software applications that incorporate databases. Topics include the development of user and system requirements, analysis of work and data flow, database design and agile project management methods.

Prerequisite: ( CISC255 ) OR ( COMP255 )

Corequisite: None

COMP306 Systems Analysis and Design

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Introduction to the systems concept, defining a system, system life cycle and information flow, systems analysis and design considerations, implementation and development of information systems. Through analysis of systems, simulated case studies, the use of CASE software, and the design of an actual business application, students learn the importance of efficient and effective information systems in modern organizations.

Prerequisite: ( CISC255 ) OR ( COMP255 )

Corequisite:   None

COMP315 Network Programming

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Provides students the necessary skill-set to design and implement software that employ Internet Protocols at various layers of the standards-based stack. Students will be introduced to the socker Application Programmer Interface (API), the transport layer, raw sockets that allow network layer programming, and specialized libraries that makes packet creation and injection possible at teh data link layer. These skills will prepare students to design and build prototypes operating at various layers of the protocol stack.

Prerequisite: ( CISC200 ) OR ( COMP200 )

Corequisite:   None

COMP322 Database System Administration

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Introduces students to installing and managing a database management system. Topics include installation, performance monitoring and tuning, user management, security, physical storage and backup and recovery techniques.

Prerequisite: ( CISC255 AND COMP202 ) OR ( COMP202 AND COMP255 )

Corequisite:   None

COMP325 Advanced SQL

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Introduces students to advanced topics in Structured Query Language (SQL) such as subqueries, correlated queries, query tuning, and PL/SQL. Difference in SQL implementation between database management systems will also be highlighted.

Prerequisite: ( CISC255 ) OR ( COMP255 )

Corequisite:   None

COMP400 Computer Architecture

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Designed to give students an understanding of the organization and relationship of components of computer systems. Concepts discussed include analysis and design of digital circuits, design of major components of computer systems, and interface of software and hardware in the control of hardware components.

Prerequisite: ( COMP255 )

Corequisite:   None

COMP402 Algorithm Analysis and Design

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

Provides a survey of classic and modern computer algorithms, demonstrates techniques to analyze algorithm performance and illustrates the design methodologies used to develop computer algorithms.

Prerequisite: ( COMP300 AND MATH205 AND MATH211 )

Corequisite:   None

COMP405 Software Engineering
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]
This course provides an introduction to the engineering principles and practices used in the process of developing modern software systems that are dependable, usable, maintainable and efficient. Students will learn the basic models of software system development including the classic waterfall and spiral models. Students will learn the processes used in these development models including requirements analysis and specification, design, prototyping, implementation, integration and testing and verification and validation. Students will learn what products are produced at each stage including reviews and documents as well as the software itself. Students will be introduced to utilities such as the configuration management software and the computer-aided software engineering (CASE) tools available to support the software development process. Students will also be introduced to concepts in project management including planning and scheduling, risk mitigation, and the use of metrics.

Prerequisite: ( COMP300 )

Corequisite:   None

COMP407 Network Systems Administration
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
Imparts skills necessary for configuring, optimizing and administering computer networks. Emphasis on skills needed to translate requirements specifications into operational networks. Course includes the configuration of local and wide area networks (LAN/WAN) and wireless networks, network management protocols and frameworks. An understanding of open standards is promoted in this course. This course emphasizes hands-on experience of network provisioning interfaces and preapres the student for industry-based certification.

Prerequisite: ( CISC200 )

Corequisite: None

COMP410 Machine Learning and Robotics

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Introduces algorithms that allow computers to learn and improve based on the analysis of empirical data gained from experience. Machine learning algorithms will be developed and applied in areas such as gaming and robotics.

Prerequisite: ( COMP300 )

Corequisite:   None

COMP412 Network Security

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Introduces applications and standards of network security. Emphasis on the operation of secure frameworks, system level security and the use of secure protocols. Topics include cryptography; secure applications and secret key management frameworks; intrusion detection; legal and ethical issues, and the dynamics of malicious software. An overview of open standards in this area is also included in this course.

Prerequisite: ( CISC200 )

Corequisite:   None

COMP415 Structure Programming Languages

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Study of language design, language processors, syntax, and semantics. What makes a language good or bad and similarities in different languages? Brief introduction to a variety of high-level languages, such as Pascal, C, SNOBOL, PROLOG, ADA, LISP, MODULA-2, which contain advanced features.

Prerequisite: ( COMP300 )

Corequisite:   None

COMP430 Interactive Graphics Programming

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Introduces the theory and practice of interactive graphics programming. Emphasis on the use of Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) that are available across different systems. Topics in addition to applications programming, include interaction with input devices; geometric transformations and viewing; concepts of lighting and shading, and rendering of images on displays.

Prerequisite: ( COMP302 )

Corequisite:   None

COMP465 Data Base Management Systems

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An examination of the various levels of organization of data base systems including the hardware level (state-of-art media, devices, channels, controllers), the physical representation of data, the logical organization of data and the overall structure of large scale information processing systems. A survey of commercial data management products. Applications to management planning and control are included.

Prerequisite: ( COMP300 )

Corequisite:   None

COMP475 Senior Capstone Seminar

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

A study of major concepts and topics in Computer Science and Information Systems that encompass the student's concentration of study. As a capstone seminar, this course is an integrating experience that requires students to apply knowledge and skills gained from previous coursework in both the core and their concentration.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

COMP480 Special Problems
[Minimum Semester Hours: 1 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]
An in-depth investigation of aspects of computer science. Topics to be determined prior to the semester in which the course is offered.

Prerequisite: ( COMP161 )

Corequisite:   None

CRJS102 Introduction to Criminal Justice
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
The history, organization, and functions of various components of the criminal justice system. Focuses on the interrelationships among law enforcement agencies, prosecution, courts, correctional processes and institutions, probation, parole, juvenile justice, and other officials and their agencies. Critical thinking is applied to the system and its practices.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite: None

CRJS119 Freshman Seminar

[Minimum Semester Hours: 1 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 1 sh]

Introduces students to the culture and mission of the University, as well as the University services available to students. The students are also exposed to the Criminal Justice major, with specific focus on required and elective coursework, internship options, and early career exploration. Students will engage in active learning and the development of effective study skills.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

CRJS205 Drug Abuse

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An introduction to the use and abuse of drugs in America. The history of such use and abuse, the pharmacology and legalization or criminalization of such drugs, the social response to drug use and abuse, effects of drugs on the body and the role of law enforcement are considered.

Prerequisite: ( CRJS102 )

Corequisite:   None

CRJS210 Diversity in Criminal Justice

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Encompasses a critical examination of the issues and problems relating to the administration of justice in a culturally diverse society. Emphasis is placed o the study of gender, race, class, sexual orientation, and ethnicity and the respective challenges these diverse characteristics pose in the various agencies of the criminal justice system. Emphasis is also placed on the opportunities and challenges of providing criminal justice services within a multicultural society. Theoretical perspectives will be included.

Prerequisite: ( CRJS102 AND SOCI101 )

Corequisite:   None

CRJS215 American Gangs: History, Identification and Interdiction

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A study of the social and cultural history of American gangs including the influence and relationship between national, regional and local adult and juvenile gangs. Includes evaluation of gang identification and membership with emphasis on their impact on crime. Emphasis is placed on growing concern within the criminal justice community of the influence and spread of youth gangs and growing hybridization and migration of gangs in terms of location, member diversity and organization.

Prerequisite: ( CRJS102 AND SOCI101 )

Corequisite:   None

CRJS220 Introduction to Conservation Law Enforcement

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An introduction to the theory and practice of Conservation Law Enforcement. An overview of the conservation law enforcement officer's role and duties in enhancing, protecting, and conserving natural areas and wildlife in the United States, with special focus on Pennsylvania, is provided. Attention is given to statutory provisions and regulations pertaining to natural resource protection and conservation. Focus is given to unique types of training requirements and risks inherent in this profession.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   (SOCI101 ) OR (CRJS102 )

CRJS240 Law Enforcement

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

The philosophical and historical background, Constitutional limitations, objectives, and processes in the enforcement of law. The nature and responsibilities of law enforcement are discussed and evaluated, including police accountability, civil liability, and multicultural issues. Critical thinking and ethical decision making in law enforcement situations are developed through case analysis, exercises and simulations.

Prerequisite: ( CRJS102 AND SOCI101 )

Corequisite:   None

CRJS260 Criminal Law
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]
Focuses on criminal law and practical application of the law. Specific emphasis on the parameters of criminal law, general principles of criminal liability, defenses to criminal liability, and definition of the different types of criminal offenses. The course emphasizes practical application of the law.

Prerequisite: ( CRJS102 )

Corequisite:   None

CRJS290 World Criminal Justice Systems
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
Considers issues related to criminal justice from the perspective of a number of nations. The course is intended to enable students to develop a creative approach to American criminal justice by seeing these issues are dealt with in other cultures.

Prerequisite: ( CRJS102 )

Corequisite: None

CRJS300 Forensic Criminology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Designed to provide students with an in depth study of the concepts of profiling, behavioral analysis, and threat assessment. The course examines a variety of serious offenses such as serial murder, serial rape, school violence, workplace violence and child abduction. Emphasis will be placed upon the underlying psychological factors and societal stressors that contribute to the above events.

Prerequisite: ( CRJS102 )

Corequisite:   None

CRJS301 Juvenile Justice

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Studies major components of the juvenile justice system in the United States. Emphasis is placed on major components of the juvenile justice system including; law enforcement, prosecution, courts, and corrections. Additional emphasis is placed on historical origins and philosophy of juvenile justice and evolution of reforms in juvenile justice. An overview of the legal framework in which the juvenile justice system operates highlights differences between adult and juvenile case processing.

Prerequisite: ( CRJS102 AND SOCI101 )

Corequisite:   None

CRJS304 Criminal Justice Ethics

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An introduction to the application of ethical theories relative to the practice of professionals in the criminal justice system. The course is designed to examine prominent moral issues faced by criminal justice professionals. The student will be required to conduct detailed examinations and evaluations of ethical issues and to apply various ethical theories, codes, and canons to arrive at moral decisions.

Prerequisite: ( CRJS102 )

Corequisite:   None

CRJS305 Corrections

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An analysis and critique of what the criminal justice system does with convicted persons.   Also a consideration of what the system should do with convicted persons.   Further, considers the long term implications of corrections policy and practice on individuals and on society.

Prerequisite: ( CRJS102 )

Corequisite:   None

CRJS309 Environmental Justice

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Explores prominent contemporary environmental issues. Engages students in analysis of various laws and policies developed to neutralize key environmental threats, including policy and statutes related to the following: natural resource management, clean air and water, and waste disposal. Specific attention is given to development and analysis of environmental laws and policy.

Prerequisite: ( CRJS102 )

Corequisite:   None

CRJS310 Criminal Investigation

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

An introduction to the principles and procedures used in criminal investigation including problem solving and scientific approaches to solving crimes.

Prerequisite: ( CRJS102 AND CRJS240 )

Corequisite:   None

CRJS315 Terrorism in the 21st Century
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]
A study of the origin and history of terrorism and its conceptual and theoretical framework in the world. This course provides an emphasis on the pre-1980's historical development of the phenomenon of terrorism and the role that this history plays in terrorism today. An overview and analysis of the major active modern terrorist groups and their respective philosophies is presented.

Prerequisite: ( CRJS102 AND SOCI101 )
Corequisite:   None

CRJS320 Topics in Criminal Justice
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
Introduces in-depth topics relevant to the varied fields of criminal justice and aspects of the criminal justice system not otherwise substantially covered in existing courses, or which are of current topical interest. May be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite: ( CRJS102 )
Corequisite: None

CRJS360 Criminal Procedure

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Considers the procedures the criminal justice professional must use in implementing the criminal law. The course primarily focuses on the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Fourteenth Amendments to the United States Constitution. The course examines issues related to the following: search and seizure, warrant requirements, right to counsel, pre and post-trial proceedings, and relevant case law.

Prerequisite: ( CRJS102 )

Corequisite:   None

CRJS425 Senior Seminar in Criminal Justice

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

This course is intended to help students consolidate their learning in criminal justice and related areas and prepare for the world of work. Major concepts from throughout the criminal justice program are reconsidered and integrated. Major emphases include integrating theory, research and the application of findings to understanding the functioning of various functions of the criminal justice system. The process of obtaining employment in the criminal justice system is also a major emphasis of this course.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

CRJS490 Criminal Justice Research

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A study of research methods used in criminal justice which includes quantitative and qualitative paradigms. Includes an evaluation of the scientific method; sampling; reliability; validity; and the relationship of statistics, theory, and research. Emphasis will be placed on the use of various types of research in the criminal justice discipline.

Prerequisite: ( MATH107 AND SOCI302 )

Corequisite:   None

CRJS600 The Correctional System

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

This course is a description and analysis of the correctional system with special emphasis on total institutions and their impact on clients and their lives. Special attention is given to the lives of clients in such systems and on their adaptations to such a way of living.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

CRJS605 Research Methods in Criminal Justice

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Provides an overview of applied research and the advanced concepts of research design most frequently used in the discipline. Students will learn how research builds to theory and how trends in the discipline are identified from the accumulation of research results. Students are also introduced to the dissemination of research in the field and ways to retrieve existing research.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

CVED200 Introduction to Deliberative Public Learning

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

Students are introduced to the theory and practice of deliberative citizen discourse in a democracy. The course links study of theory with participation in actual public forums. Principles of deliberative discourse are studied in relation to theories of democracy and then applied in public forums. Students become effective moderators in public deliberative forums and interpreters of results. This course also prepares students for more advanced study in the theory and practice of civic engagement and public scholarship.   (Fulfills external experience general education)

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

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