Course Descriptions - G

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Geography  |  Geology  |  German

GEOG100 Physical Geography

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An introduction to the physical geographical elements of the world. The earth's principal spheres (atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere) are explored through time and space as they respond to change. Major areas of study are the water cycle and budget, global soil systems, natural vegetation zones, climatic regions, earth dynamics, and ecological energetics.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

GEOG101 World Regional Geography

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Examines the economic, political, environmental, and cultural processes that influence the spatial interaction between less and more developed regions of the world with particular emphasis on how regions are being unevenly affected by globalization.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

GEOG110 General Climatology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

The course provides an introduction to the basic fundamentals of general climatology The basic components of climate and weather are introduced. Climate classifications and their geographic distribution are carefully explained and mapped. The interactions of human and biotic activity with weather phenomena and climate types are identified, examined, and studied. Laboratory exercises are coordinated so as to introduce students to the scientific method of weather data collection and weather mapping.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

GEOG180 Urban Geography

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

The course provides an introduction to cities as the artificial home of modern people. Urbanization is currently one of the principal physical, cultural, economic, social and political problems facing the world. Populations are rapidly changing from predominantly rural to urban in their distribution. The modern city frees the poor and the oppressed minorities from rural biases only to introduce them to the societal ills of urban slums. Through use of models students come to appreciate the social physics of urban function, growth and morphology. An appreciation of the city and its intricacies is developed. Future possibilities are discussed and explained.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

GEOG212 Geography Developing World

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

A general introduction to the cultural and physical features of the developing regions of the world. These areas are sometimes referred to as the Third World. Following examination of the physical and cultural geography, the regional geography of the developing world will be studied. Features of the developed and developing regions of the world will be identified, compared and contrasted. Development problems and potentials will be considered for the areas of urbanization, industrialization and modernization.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

GEOG214 Geography Developed World
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]
A general introduction to the physical and cultural geography of the developed regions of the world. An introduction to the physical and human elements of the environment is followed by an in-depth examination of the major developed regions of the world. Issues of industrialization, international trade and technological development are set in their geographic environments and examined.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

GEOG220 Cartography
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
An introduction to maps, cartographic techniques and map production. The basics of map reading and map making will be introduced. Students will be introduced to aerial photo interpretation and remote sensing. Basic programs in computer will be introduced and used.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite: None

GEOG305 Conservation Natural Resources

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An introduction to the conservation ideas from an optimistic viewpoint. Basic earth materials must be employed or converted to sustain our material culture. The basic resources are investigated and discussed. Major areas of study are water, minerals, soils, energy, forests, wildlife, pollution, and environmental quality.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

GEOG315 Political Geography

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

The course is an in-depth study of how geography has influenced political phenomena throughout history. Political processes and environmental interaction at various levels of the political hierarchy are examined. Present day political problems are viewed in their aerial context.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

GEOG328 Social Science Seminar

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Uses a thematic and topical approach to examine issues in geography such as ethnic conflict, regional integration and separatism, regional development, sustainable development, poverty and uneven development, environmental degradation, and overpopulation (to be determined by the professor). Particular emphasis is placed on historical, political, and economic forces as they relate to contemporary issues associated with globalization.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

GEOG401 Special Problems

[Minimum Semester Hours: 1 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 4 sh]

Individual research under the guidance of the Geography staff. For advanced students in Geography.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

GEOG430 Urban & Regional Planning

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Urban and Regional Planning is a means for systematically anticipating and achieving adjustments in the physical environment of a city consistent with social and economic trends and sound principles of urban environmental design and management. Therefore, it involves a continual process of deriving, organizing, and presenting a broad and comprehensive program for urban development and renewal. Land use planning will be considered as a means to fulfill local objectives of social, economic, and physical well-being, considering both immediate needs and those of the foreseeable future.

Prerequisite: ( GEOG180 )

Corequisite:   None

GEOG440 Economic Geography

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

This course in Economic Geography emphasizes the need for universal control of the spatially distributed natural resources. Economic Geography can be regarded as a science concerned with the rational development, and testing of theories that explain and predict the spatial distribution and location of various characteristics on the surface of the earth. These characteristics are related to the consumption, production, and exchange of goods and services. The scientific approach to the analysis of this spatial distribution and its interrelationships involves two aspects, which are equally important. The first is the collection of facts or data, and the second is the synthesis of these facts into meaningful theories of great interest to economic geographers in the quantitative analysis of spatial distributions to discern the presence and form of patterns.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

GEOG445 Geography of Latin America
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]
A systematic, conceptual, methodological framework is devised as a basis to view the various regions. Included is the survey of Mexico, countries of Central American, major countries and areas of the West Indies, and all the South American countries. Emphasis is placed upon regional comparisons. The relations of Latin American countries among themselves and the rest of the world are stressed.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

GEOS101 Earth Science
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
An introduction to Earth-system processes in the context of astronomy, meteorology, geology, and oceanography. Examines the Earth's relationship to the Sun, Moon, and planets in the solar system. The Earth's major processes, including the hydrologic cycle, the rock cycle, plate tectonics, global wind circulation, ocean circulation, global climatic phenomena, and human-induced changes in the environment are examined through lectures and hands-on laboratory investigations.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite: None

GEOS120 Oceanography

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A comprehensive study of major components of oceans, including the origin of evolution of ocean floors, energy and mineral resources of oceans, chemical constituents and reactions in seawater, air-sea interactions, marine organisms and the relationships between these organisms and the environments of oceans. Ocean-related environmental concerns, including beach erosion, wetland loss, sea-level fluctuations, and point sources and non-point sources of pollution are discussed. (This course is required for majors in Secondary Education/Earth and Space Science, Secondary Education/General Science, and Biology/Marine Biology. Therefore they will receive preference for registering for the course. A required four-day field trip to Wallops Island, VA for which the students have an out of pocket expense of $100 at the field station, plus meal expenses on the trip to and from the Marine Science consortium station.)

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

GEOS130 Principles of Geology I

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

The Earth its structure, composition, agents of construction and destruction. Lab activity designed to train students in the identification of rocks and minerals and interpretation of topographic and geologic maps. Fulfills General Education Requirements

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

GEOS131 Principles of Geology II

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Designed to gain an appreciation of the deepness of geologic time and the vastness of space and to develop an understanding of the geologic and biologic processes through which the Earth and life on Earth evolved over geologic time. Students acquire hands-on experience on the use of scientific equipment and mapping tools in the field and in laboratory settings. Applications of stratigraphic principles to interpret Earth's history and the trend in evolution of life are emphasized.

Prerequisite: ( GEOS130 ) OR ( GEOS110 )

Corequisite:   None

GEOS213 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An introduction to geographic information systems (GIS) with emphasis on capturing, storing, editing, querying, displaying, and analyzing geographically referenced data. Lecture and laboratory materials are designed to provide students with hands-on experience on real-world applications of GIS in their respective fields.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

GEOS215 Environmental Geology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Students will traverse the spectrum of applied geology focusing upon its relation to human activities. Included among topics are water availability; geologic hazards such as earth quakes, landslides, and land subsidence; mineral and energy resources; engineering geology, waste disposal and pollution; land-use planning; coasts and coastal management; and medical and legal aspects of geology.

Prerequisite: ( GEOS110 ) OR ( GEOS130 )

Corequisite:   None

GEOS230 Geomorphology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

A study of landforms and the factors involved in their formation including geologic processes, composition, structure, and climate. The laboratory emphasizes the recognition of various landforms using topographic and aerial photographs.

Prerequisite: ( GEOS110 ) OR ( GEOS130 )

Corequisite:   None

GEOS260 Geology Field Trip
[Minimum Semester Hours: 1 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 1sh ]
Guided field trips focusing upon various areas of geologic interest. Successive trips have different emphases. Pre-trip meeting required. Participants should expect to incur expenses for meals and lodging.

Prerequisite: ( GEOS130 ) OR ( GEOS110 )

Corequisite:   None

GEOS301 Invertebrate Paleontology
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
An introduction to the study of invertebrate fossils including: system of classification, types of fossil preservation, nomenclature, characteristic structures, ecology and evolution of the paleontologically important invertebrate phyla.

Prerequisite: ( GEOS210 ) OR ( BIOL240 ) OR ( GEOS131 )

Corequisite: None

GEOS305 Mineralogy and Petrology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 4 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 4 sh]

An introduction to the origin, occurrence, crystallography, and chemical and physical properties of geologically important minerals. Includes a study of the classification and interpretation of igneous and metamorphic rocks.

Prerequisite: ( GEOS110 ) OR ( GEOS130 )

Corequisite:   None

GEOS313 Advanced Geographic Information Systems

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Deals with advanced topics in geographic information systems (GIS), including spatial reference data, geometric transformation, raster data analyses, terrain mapping, viewsheds and watersheds, spacial interpolation, geocoding, dynamic segmentation, path analyses, geostatistics, mobile GIS, and GIS models and modeling. Lecture and laboratory exercises are designed to provide students with hands-on experience with real-world applications of GIS in solving problems in diverse fields.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL213 ) OR ( GEOS213 )

Corequisite:   None

GEOS315 Sedimentology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

The study of sedimentary materials, processes, depositional environments, and the products of sedimentation. Laboratories focus upon collection, analysis, and presentation of field data and the description and interpretation of both consolidated and unconsolidated sedimentary materials applying various petrologic and petrographic techniques.

Prerequisite: ( GEOS210 ) OR ( GEOS131 )

Corequisite:   None

GEOS328 Science Seminar

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

The course looks at how scientists search for knowledge and try to gain an understanding of natural phenomena. Students explore the roles science and technology play in human activities both locally and globally. Specific topics vary and are based on the expertise and interest of the faculty member responsible for teaching the course that semester.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

GEOS360 Hydrogeology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 4 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 4 sh]

A course that emphasizes practical hydrogeologic principles, stressing interactions between geology and both surface and underground water. Topics include occurrence, production, and management of groundwater, water quality, flooding and flood control, and sources of information for the practicing hydrogeologist.

Prerequisite: ( GEOS110 AND MATH141 ) OR ( GEOS130 AND MATH141 )

Corequisite:   None

GEOS361 Aqueous Environmental Geochemistry

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

An upper-level course designed to help students develop in-depth knowledge of geochemical processes and factors controlling chemical composition and chemical reactions that impact the quality of both surface water and groundwater in natural and anthropogenically disturbed/perturbed geological systems.

Prerequisite: ( CHEM121 AND GEOS110 ) OR ( CHEM121 AND GEOS130 )

Corequisite:   None

GEOS415 Stratigraphy
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]
The principles of lithostratigraphy and biostratigraphy form the core of this course. Geochronology and the recently developed techniques of seismic, magnetic, and isotopic stratigraphy supplement those classical principles. Laboratories emphasize the field identification and interpretation of vertical and lateral relationships of sedimentary sequences.

Prerequisite: ( GEOS315 )

Corequisite:   None

GEOS420 Geology of Energy & Mineral Resources
[Minimum Semester Hours: 4 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 4 sh]
Geologic occurrence and methods of locating, mining, evaluating, and processing fossil fuels and industrial and ore minerals. Geology of major, worldwide fuel and mineral deposits and environmental problems associated with their exploitation.

Prerequisite: ( GEOS221 ) OR ( GEOS305 )

Corequisite: None

GEOS430 Structural Geology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 4 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 4 sh]

The constant movements of lithospheric plates relative to one another throughout the immensity of geologic time account for the regional and local displacement and deformation of the Earth's outer layers. These deformational processes along with the changes in the size and shape of the coherent rock masses and the internal arrangement of their constituent elements are the focus of this area of geological investigation.

Prerequisite: ( GEOS210 ) OR ( GEOS131 )

Corequisite:   None

GEOS450 Geophysics and Tectonics

[Minimum Semester Hours: 4 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 4 sh]

Geophysical methods used to study the Earth and other planetary bodies, including geophysical foundations of plate-tectonic theory. The course includes geophysical techniques used in mineral-resource exploration, engineering, and characterization of waste-disposal sites.

Prerequisite: ( GEOS210 ) OR ( GEOS131 )

Corequisite:   None

GEOS451 Coastal Environmental Oceanography

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Advanced topics in coastal geomorphology and environmental issues pertinent to coastal settings, including human impacts on coastal landforms, shoreline erosion, wetland loss, sea-level fluctuations, nutrients in estuaries, metals in bays, and climate change. Lecture, field trips, and laboratory exercises are designed to provide students with hands-on experience with field and laboratory equipment used to solve real-world problems in diverse coastal settings.

Prerequisite: ( GEOS120 ) OR ( GEOS130 )

Corequisite:   None

GEOS458 Advanced Applied Nanotechnology Laboratory

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Laboratory experience drawn from an undergraduate foundation in sciences including areas of current research in nanotechnology. Experimental methods and analysis are used, with emphasis on group and individual work in the planning, execution, and presentation of research. Students may repeat for credit.

Prerequisite: ( PHAP206 )

Corequisite:   None

GEOS490 Capstone Research Project

[Minimum Semester Hours: 2 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 2 sh]

Students engage in an intensive independent research project related to their major concentration that will culminate in a research paper and presentation based on data collected and interpreted using scientific methods.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

GEOS628 Science Seminar

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

The course looks at how scientists search for knowledge and try to gain an understanding of natural phenomena. Students explore the roles science and technology play in human activities both locally and globally. Specific topics vary and are based upon the expertise and interest of the faculty member responsible for teaching the course that semester.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

GERM101 German 1
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]
An introduction to the fundamentals of German grammar and syntax, with special attention to pronunciation, reading, speaking, listening and writing of simple sentences and prose selections.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

GERM102 German 2
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
An introduction to the fundamentals of German grammar and syntax, with special attention to pronunciation, reading, speaking, listening and writing of simple sentences and prose selections.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite: None

GERM201 German 3

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A review of the fundamentals of German language and pronunciation; reading of short German prose works illustrating aspects of style; development of vocabulary and linguistic fluency.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

GERM202 German 4

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A review of the fundamentals of German language and pronunciation; reading of short German prose works illustrating aspects of style; development of vocabulary and linguistic fluency.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite: None

GERM203 German Culture 1

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

The study of significant aspects of German culture, including current events and movements. Special attention is given to the outstanding persons, events and forces in art, music, theater, philosophy, politics, education, and religion, with a view towards understanding the German ethos.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

GERM204 German Culture 2

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

The study of significant aspects of German culture, including current events and movements. Special attention is given to the outstanding persons, events and forces in art, music, theater, philosophy, politics, education, and religion, with a view towards understanding the German ethos.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

GERM301 German Comp & Conversation 1

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Advanced course to develop fluency in speaking and writing. Classroom time is devoted mainly to conversation about everyday life. Compositions will be written on contemporary topics. Grammar is treated as necessary.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

GERM302 German Comp & Conversation 2

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

Advanced course to develop fluency in speaking and writing. Classroom time is devoted mainly to conversation about everyday life. Compositions will be written on contemporary topics. Grammar is treated as necessary.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

GERM303 German Literature 1
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]
Readings from selected authors representative of the main periods of modern literature. Lectures on literary history and the lives of the more important writers supplement the discussion of works being studied. Students are expected to develop and express critical opinions.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

GERM304 German Literature 2
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
Readings from selected authors representative of the main periods of modern literature. Lectures on literary history and the lives of the more important writers supplement the discussion of works being studied. Students are expected to develop and express critical opinions.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite: None

GERM305 Advanced German Grammar 1

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A thorough review of the grammatical structure of the German language. Students learn to communicate correctly and effectively in German by means of extensive oral and written exercises that focus on specific areas of grammar.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

GERM306 Advanced German Grammar 2

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A thorough review of the grammatical structure of the German language. Students learn to communicate correctly and effectively in German by means of extensive oral and written exercises that focus on specific areas of grammar.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

GERM328 Humanities Seminar

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A survey of German film since 1970. Films will be studied as expressions of German culture and of a specifically German view of the world. Films are shown with English subtitles; no knowledge of German is necessary.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

GERM402 German Prose 2

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A survey of German prose fiction since the eighteenth century. Students will study such modern writers as Hermann Hesse, Franz Kafka, Heinrich Boll, Thomas Mann, and Max Frisch. Literary works are studied both as products of their age and culture and for their own thematic interest. Changes in style, technique, and worldview are examined in historical perspective.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

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