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Physician Assistant

PHAP400 Modern Optoelectronics
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
Introduces the fundamentals of the physical phenomena related to generation, propagation, manipulation and detection of light, and the application of these phenomena in solid state devices. Special topics will include interactions of light with materials systems of current importance (e.g. semiconductors, nanosized metal particles, biological macromolecules). Pre- or Co-requisite: PHYS315 and PHYS370

Prerequisite: ( PHYS315 AND PHYS370 )

Corequisite: None

PHAP410 Material Science

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Introduces fundamental physical phenomena related to solid state materials. Covers the mechanical, electrical, magnetic, optical and thermal properties of solid state materials, as well as defects in solids and how they influence the materials' properties. The applications emphasized in this course concern the developments of nanomaterials and nanostructures. Pre- or co-requisite: PHYS315 and PHYS370

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   (PHYS315 ANDPHYS370 )

PHIL101 Problems in Philosophy

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Introduces a number of fundamental philosophical problems traditional to philosophy. Primary emphasis is on problems of knowledge, introduced through analysis of the works of several major philosophers. Fulfills General Education Requirements.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PHIL102 Ethics

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An introduction to moral philosophy. Considers the problems of values, ideals, and standards of human action, both individual and social. Selected readings in a wide range of traditional and modern ethical approaches. Fulfills General Education Requirements.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PHIL105 Philosophy of Religion

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An introduction to the basic problems of religion, such as the nature of religion, the existence of God, knowledge of God, the language of religion, immortality, and eschatology. Fulfills General Education Requirements.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PHIL106 Social & Political Philosophy

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A study of the traditional and contemporary philosophical issues of man in society, especially those problems concerning justice which exist as a result of human government. Fulfills General Education Requirements.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PHIL110 Critical Thinking

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

Focuses on creating in students an understanding of the many facets and pitfalls of good and bad reasoning. Emphasis is divided between the theoretical, logical issues and the practical application of good reasoning in a wide variety of contexts, both personal and public. This course does not meet the philosophy general education requirement.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PHIL201 Classical Philosophy
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]
The development of philosophy from Thales to Plotinus, covering the Greek and Roman periods. Major emphasis on Plato and Aristotle. Fulfills General Education Requirements.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PHIL202 Medieval Philosophy
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
A study of the development of philosophy from Augustine in the fourth century A.D. to William of Ockham in the 14th century. Special emphasis is placed on Augustine and Aquinas. Fulfills General Education Requirements.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite: None

PHIL204 Modern Philosophy

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An historical study of the major figures and movements in philosophy from the 17th to the 19th century. The accent is upon the problems and methods of philosophy. Fulfills General Education Requirements.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PHIL205 Contemporary Philosophy

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

The major movements in the philosophy of the 20th century. Considers idealism, Neo-Thomism, Marxism, Phenomenology and Existentialism, Logical Positivism, Linguistic Analysis, and Naturalism. Fulfills General Education Requirements.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PHIL206 American Philosophy

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A general study of philosophy in the U.S. since the middle of the 19th century. The emphasis is upon the works of those philosophers of this country who have developed themes peculiarly American. Fulfills General Education Requirements.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PHIL207 Asian Philosophies

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A study of the major schools of Indian and Chinese philosophy which developed out of Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, and Confucianism. The emphasis will be on the metaphysical, epistemological, and ethical insights of the various systems. Fulfills General Education Requirements.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PHIL210 19th Century Philosophy

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A survey of the major European and American philosophers of the 1800's, including Hegel, Marx, Mill, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Kierkegaard, and James. Emphasis will be placed on the influence of these thinkers on contemporary thought. Fulfills General Education Requirements.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PHIL215 Canadian Philosophy

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

Introduces Canadian Philosophy and sets forth Canadian Philosophy as a distinct system of inquiry. In particular, close attention will be paid to the relationship between Canadian philosophy and Canadian intellectual history. Particular focus will be placed on the philosophical notion of community and its impact on Canadian society. Fulfills General Education Requirements.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PHIL301 Philosophy of Science
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]
An investigation of the nature and techniques of scientific explanation. Study of such questions as the nature of scientific method, the logic of scientific explanation, theory construction, causality, and the nature of the laws of science. Primary emphasis on the philosophical questions involved in the work of science and the link between science and philosophy. Fulfills General Education Requirements.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PHIL304 Existentialism
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
A study of how 20th century existentialism, both in its religious and its atheistic forms, grows out of the work of its three 19th century precursors: Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, and Dostoevsky.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite: None

PHIL305 Metaphysics

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A study of the most general questions concerning the nature of reality including such problems as the reality of an external world, the significance of human existence, the nature of time, space, substance, cause, and the status of natural laws.

Prerequisite: ( PHIL*** )

Corequisite:   None

PHIL306 Theory of Knowledge

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Examines the basic problems of epistemology, such as the nature, the reliability, and the proper objects of knowledge. Considers questions pertaining to the nature of truth, theories of perception, the problems of universals, concepts, and categories.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PHIL307 Philosophy of Art

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An analysis of various concepts of aesthetics. Investigation into some of the fundamental questions involved in the philosophy of art. Aestheticians, both historical and contemporary. The application of aesthetic theory to art forms both past and present. Aesthetics approached from a worldwide outlook. Probes deeply into the arts for broader aesthetic understanding.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PHIL308 Logic

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Standard logical notions and techniques. Chief emphasis on forms of argument, modes of valid inference, traditional and modern approaches to deductive argument, and inductive theory. Syllogistic and mathematical logic. The course does not meet the philosophy general education requirement.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PHIL312 Ethical Theory

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A historical survey of ethical theorizing from the Ancient Greeks to the 21st Century. It will focus on the various justifications offered for competing ethical theories, and the problems that their critics raised about each of them. Comparisons and contrasts between Western and Eastern approaches to ethical decision making and the inculcation of moral virtue, and with feminist approaches to ethical theorizing, will also be drawn.

Prerequisite: ( PHIL102 )

Corequisite:   None

PHIL315 Philosophy of Law

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

The exploration of such broad questions as What is law?, How are law and morality related?, and How should we best conceptualize legal reasoning? Specific topics might include, among others, legal theories, equality, rights and freedoms (speech, religion, etc), civil disobedience and violence, and gender and race in the American legal and social context.

Prerequisite: ( ENGL100 ) OR ( HONR111 ) OR ( PHIL*** )

Corequisite:   None

PHIL328 Humanities Seminar
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]
This seminar is intended to familiarize students with the questions that philosophers and individuals have always asked and to help them realize that, although the answers change, the questions remain the same. Different aspects and questions may be dealt with in several philosophy seminars.

Prerequisite: ( ENGL100 ) OR ( HONR111 )

Corequisite:   None

PHIL400 Ethics and the Environment
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
Explores philosophical questions related to the human relationship with, and use of, the environment. Topics may include preservation vs. conversation, holistic ethics, anthropocentrism, wilderness, feminist approaches to environmental ethics, Deep Ecology, radical environmental activism, and environmental justice. Emphasis is given to Western ethical traditions, though other perspectives may be included.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite: None

PHIL415 Ethical Issues in the Health Care Professions

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An examination of some of the major ethical issues in the various health care professions. Particular analysis will include, but not be limited to the following: the allocation of medical resources; consent and truth telling in medicine; genetic engineering; reproductive technologies; and advanced directives. Professionals from various health care fields will be invited to speak on selected topics.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PHIL425 Ethics in Business & Industry

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An in-depth survey of the relevance of ethical theory to the making of professional decisions in business and industry. An extensive introduction to ethical theory and logic is followed by a discussion of difficult ethical dilemmas that professionals must confront every day. Emphasis is placed on hiring and firing practices, advertising and marketing, environmental issues, and the impact of industry on society at large. Fulfills General Education Requirements.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PHIL615 Ethical Issues in the Health Care Professions

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An examination of some of the major ethical issues in the various health care professions. Particular analysis will include, but not be limited to the following: the allocation of medical resources; consent and truth telling in medicine; genetic engineering; reproductive technologies; and advanced directives. Professionals from various health care fields will be invited to speak on selected topics.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PHIL620 Bio-Medical Ethics: An Overview

[Minimum Semester Hours: 1 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 1 sh]

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of some of the major ethical issues in medicine and possible approaches to resolving ethical dilemmas in that context. Particular attention will be given to the following topics: the allocation of medical resources, consent and truth telling in medicine, confidentiality, and advanced directives.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PHIL625 Ethics in Business & Industry

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An in-depth survey of the relevance of ethical theory to the making of professional decisions in business and industry. An extensive introduction to ethical theory and logic is followed by a discussion of difficult ethical dilemmas that professionals must confront every day. Emphasis is placed on hiring and firing practices, advertising and marketing, environmental issues, and the impact of industry on society at large.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PHIL628 Humanities Seminar

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

Graduate philosophy seminar.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PHIL690 Current Philosophies of Education
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]
A study of the philosophies of education that have had an impact on education today. The works of educational philosophies and critiques of their positions will be read and discussed. The implications for today’s educational experiences will be discussed.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PHYS101 Matter & Energy
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
Introduces the underlying physical principles of energy generation and consumption. Topics include the atomic and subatomic structure of matter, forms of energy, energy conservation, thermodynamics, heat engines, electromagnetic induction, radioactivity, nuclear reactors, nuclear fusion, solar radiation, solar collectors, gravitational force, and tidal power. Knowledge is achieved using scientific inquiry methods - conceptual understanding, laboratory exercises, and activities developing the skills for quantitative evaluation of processes. Fulfills General Education Requirements.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite: None

PHYS102 The Mechanical Universe

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Introduces what is traditionally called Newtonian Mechanics including one- and two-dimensional motion, Newton's Laws, momentum, energy, and circular and simple harmonic motion. The course employs a laboratory-first, inquiry-oriented format that places emphasis on the investigation of problems in the physical world with the results of investigations being used to drive further instruction.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PHYS105 Engineering Graphics

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Use and care of drawing instruments; proper weights and types of lines for clear-cut, and complete graphics representation; useful geometrical construction; lettering; freehand sketching, orthographic projection; auxiliary and sectional views; pictorial representation with emphasis on isometric drawing; dimensioning; true lengths and shapes. Emphasis on practical application and development of the ability to think in three dimensions. (Prior to fall 2005, course was 2.0 sh)

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PHYS110 How Things Work

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An introduction to a current understanding of the physical universe in terms of fundamental principles of physics.  Basic concepts are studied and related to common phenomena and applications found in everyday life as well as more exotic phenomena one may come across in the news or popular-science media.  The lecture will make frequent use of experimental equipment and commercial devices in demonstrations of physical principles.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PHYS130 Physics 1

[Minimum Semester Hours: 4 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 4 sh]

An algebra-based introduction to mechanics, thermodynamics, vibrations and waves.

Prerequisite: ( MATH113 ) OR ( MATH141 ) OR ( MATH142 ) OR ( MATH243 ) OR ( MATH244 ) OR ( MATH135 )

Corequisite:   None

PHYS131 Physics 2

[Minimum Semester Hours: 4 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 4 sh]

An algebra-based introduction to electricity, magnetism, optics and modern physics.

Prerequisite: ( PHYS130 )

Corequisite:   None

PHYS135 Meteorology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

An introduction to meteorology through the systematic study of the atmosphere including composition and structure. Analysis of the laws and underlying principles of the atmospheric change and motion. The origin and development of weather features and their significance in weather forecasting. Study of global weather features and climate and climate change. Fulfills General Education Lab Science Requirement

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PHYS140 Astronomy of the Solar System
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]
An introduction to the methods and discoveries of astronomy focusing on the solar system.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PHYS145 Stars, Galaxies, and Cosmology
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
Presents the methods and discoveries of astronomy focusing on stars, galaxies and cosmology. Fulfills General Education Requirements.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite: None

PHYS170 Intermediate General Physics 1

[Minimum Semester Hours: 4 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 4 sh]

An introduction to motion, sound, and heat employing the methods of calculus and vector analysis. Co-requisite: MATH141.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   (MATH141 )

PHYS171 Intermediate General Physics 2

[Minimum Semester Hours: 4 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 4 sh]

An introduction to electricity, magnetism and optics employing the methods of calculus and vector analysis. Co-requisite: MATH142

Prerequisite: ( PHYS170 )

Corequisite:   (MATH142 )

PHYS250 Heat

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An intermediate course in heat. More intensive development of basic concepts and principles in the study of the properties of gases and in thermodynamics. Temperature measurements, expansivity, specific heats, thermal conductivity of solids and liquids, thermal properties of gases, changes of phase, and heat engines.

Prerequisite: ( PHYS130 ) OR ( PHYS170 )

Corequisite:   None

PHYS290 Electronics

[Minimum Semester Hours: 4 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 4 sh]

Introduces the analysis of linear electric circuits including nodal and mesh analysis, network theorems and their applications for direct-current circuits, transient circuits, and AC steady state analysis. Uses linear algebra, differential equations, and complex variables for circuit analysis. Incorporates the concept of building linear models for electronic components for the case of operational amplifiers and diodes. Develops practical skills for circuit simulation using computer software, assembling electronic circuits, and performing basic electrical measurements.

Prerequisite: ( PHYS171 )

Corequisite:   None

PHYS310 Physics Lab Development & Supervision

[Minimum Semester Hours: 1 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 2 sh]

Supervised experience in development and supervision of physics laboratory activities. Will include opportunity to design, develop, and construct laboratory and demonstration apparatus in physics, and to conduct laboratory classes under direct supervision of a physics faculty member. Offered by individualized instruction.

Prerequisite: ( PHYS171 )

Corequisite:   None

PHYS314 Atomic & Nuclear Physics w/o Lab

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

An introduction to modern physics: atomic structure and spectra, radiation, wave and particle aspects of matter, quantum theory, radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, nuclear structure, elementary particles.   Does not include a laboratory.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PHYS315 Modern Physics
[Minimum Semester Hours: 4 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 4sh ]
An introduction to modern physics: atomic structure and spectra, radiation, wave and particle aspects of matter, quantum theory, radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, nuclear structure, elementary particles.

Prerequisite: ( MATH243 AND PHYS131 ) OR ( MATH243 AND PHYS171 )

Corequisite:   None

PHYS325 Optics
[Minimum Semester Hours: 4 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 4 sh]
An intermediate course in optics. Geometrical and physical optics, reflection and refraction at surfaces, lenses, interference and diffraction, elementary spectroscopy and polarization of light. Applications to the study of optical instruments.

Prerequisite: ( MATH243 AND PHYS131 ) OR ( MATH243 AND PHYS171 )

Corequisite: None

PHYS328 Science Seminar

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An examination of how scientists search for knowledge and try to gain an understanding of natural phenomena. This course also explores the interplay between science, technology, and other human activities locally and globally. Topics will be chosen based on the interest and expertise of the instructor.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PHYS330 Mechanics 1

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An intermediate course in Newtonian mechanics with emphasis on mathematical principles and methods. Topics include vector calculus, statics, dynamics, momentum and energy conservation, oscillations, central force motion, and two dimensional rigid body dynamics.

Prerequisite: ( PHYS171 )

Corequisite:   None

PHYS331 Mechanics 2

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Continuation of Mechanics with an emphasis on the variational methods of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalisms. Topics include generalized coordinates, symmetries, central forces, Euler's equations, normalized coordinates, strings and vibrations, and mechanics of rigid bodies in three dimensions.

Prerequisite: ( PHYS330 )

Corequisite:   None

PHYS345 Mathematical Methods of Physics

[Minimum Semester Hours: 2 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 2 sh]

An introduction to the mathematical techniques of theoretical physics. Topics will include the partial differential equations and boundary value problems associated with wave motion, the diffusion of heat and quantum mechanical probability, and electromagnetic potentials and fields.

Prerequisite: ( MATH211 AND MATH301 AND PHYS171 )

Corequisite:   None

PHYS350 Quantum Mechanics

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An advanced undergraduate level introduction into the principles, formalism and results of quantum mechanics including historical background, Schroedinger equations, particle in box, harmonic oscillator, one dimensional crystals, hydrogen atom, angular momentum, light and introduction to perturbation theory.

Prerequisite: ( MATH244 AND PHYS315 )

Corequisite:   None

PHYS370 Electricity & Magnetism

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

An intermediate course in electricity and magnetism focusing on Maxwell's equations and their properties. The course will concentrate on the concepts associated with electromagnetic fields and will introduce the mathematics used for their description.

Prerequisite: ( MATH142 AND PHYS171 )

Corequisite:   None

PHYS371 Electrodynamics
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]
An exploration of electricity and magnetism that emphasizes fields within materials, electromagnetic radiation, and methods of solving static and dynamical problems.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PHYS391 Problems in Physics
[Minimum Semester Hours: 1 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 4 sh]
Independent study and research under the direction of the Physics staff. For advanced students, who may register for the course more than once. Each semester.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite: None

PHYS431 Advanced Physics Laboratory

[Minimum Semester Hours: 2 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Experimental work drawn from an undergraduate foundation in physics including areas of current research. Sophisticated experimental methods and analysis will be used, with emphasis on independence and individual initiative in the planning, execution, and presentation of research. A student may repeat for credit.

Prerequisite: ( PHYS315 )

Corequisite:   None

PHYS458 Advanced Applied Nanotechnology Laboratory

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Laboratory experience drawn from an undergraduate foundation in sciences including areas of current research in nanotechnology. Experimental methods and analysis are used, with emphasis on group and individual work in the planning, execution, and presentation of research. Students may repeat for credit.

Prerequisite: ( PHAP206 )

Corequisite:   None

PHYS628 Science Seminar

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

This seminar explores various topics in the physical sciences with an emphasis on physics. Students are expected to research and develop knowledge on subjects discussed in the seminar, where the expertise of the instructor is used to explain and interpret the more technical aspects. Students will participate in class discussions using a knowledge base formed in part by class assignments. Students will give presentations to the class. Specific topic selection is based upon the expertise and interest of the designated science faculty. Examples include: Biographies of 20th Century Physicists, Science in the 20th Century, Pseudoscience, Science and Science Fiction, and Popularization of Science.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PLSH101 Polish 1

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An introduction to the basics of the foreign language in question; the course is especially designed for students who wish to spend a semester at a university in a country where the language is spoken. The primary emphasis of the course will be on developing basic listening, reading and speaking skills in the language and increasing the students' awareness of the foreign culture.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PLSH102 Polish 2

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

The study of the foreign language in question, building on the material learned in the level I course. Especially designed for students who wish to improve their basic knowledge of the language in order to be able to study at the foreign university that supplied the instructor (completion of this course followed by a semester of study abroad at the university will satisfy the foreign language requirement).

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PLSH201 Polish 3

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

The study of the foreign language in question, building upon the material learned in the Level 2 course and especially designed for students who wish to enhance their knowledge of that language.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PLSH202 Polish 4
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]
The study of the foreign language in question, building upon the material learned in the Level 1, 2 and 3 courses and especially designed for students who wish to enhance their knowledge of that language.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PLSH328 Humanities Seminar
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Prerequisite: None
Corequisite: None

POLI101 Political Science

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A comprehensive approach to political fundamentals: theory and organization of the modern state; the theory, processes, and ideologies of all types of governments. Basic to further study of the structure and function of government. Fulfills General Education Requirements.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

POLI105 American National Government

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

The general principles, structure and functions of the American federal government. The rights and duties of citizenship, civil rights, political parties, special interest groups. The growing importance of the regulatory functions of government. Fulfills General Education Requirements.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

POLI107 World Politics

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An introduction to the fields of international relations, foreign policy and international political economy. The course reviews the evolution of the modern international system and introduces basic theories and models used by political scientists and others in analyzing world politics. Primary emphasis on the post-Cold War “world order” and major issues confronting it.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

POLI119 First Year Student Seminar

[Minimum Semester Hours: 1 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 1 sh]

Introduces students to the culture and mission of the University and its programs of study, with a particular emphasis on the social sciences. Explores the purpose of a liberal arts education as a foundation for professional development and life-long learning. Through class discussion of readings and activities, students are engaged in active learning and teh development of effective college study skills.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

POLI200 Introduction to Political Inquiry and Action

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Prepares students for advanced study in political science by introducing the various modes of political inquiry, competing theories of democracy, and the range of methods and information resources used in the study of politics and public policy.

Prerequisite: ( POLI101 ) OR ( POLI105 ) OR ( POLI107 )

Corequisite:   None

POLI205 Comparative Politics

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

An analysis of the method and scope of the comparative study of government, and an examination of selected countries representing advanced industrial and developing democracies as well as authoritarian systems.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

POLI210 State & Local Government
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]
Examines the political process, governmental institutions, and the politics of governing at the state and local levels today. Special effort will be made to examine Pennsylvania examples. Fulfills political science/economics general education requirement.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

POLI230 Political Parties & Elections
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
This is an intermediate level undergraduate course intended to build upon knowledge acquired in introductory courses in political science. The course examines the role function of political parties and electoral processes in the U.S. and elsewhere. In broader terms, the course explores the theoretical and practical linkages among political parties, electoral processes, and the development and maintenance of representative democracy.

Prerequisite: ( POLI101 ) OR ( POLI105 )

Corequisite: None

POLI250 US Foreign Policy

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An examination of the nature of foreign policy, the manner in which foreign policy is formulated and executed in a democracy, and the objectives and limits of U.S. Foreign Policy. Emphasis is placed on U.S. Foreign Policy since 1945.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

POLI260 Intro Public Administration

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Survey of governmental administration in the U.S. with particular emphasis on the national government. Organization and management, budgeting, personnel, planning and public relations.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

POLI301 Comparative Government

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An analysis of the methods and scope of the comparative study of government, and an examination of political systems in selected countries with a focus on well established industrialized system.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

POLI305 Congress and the Presidency

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Examines the nature of the relationship and interdependencies between the Congress and the Presidency of the United States. Focuses on the constitutional powers of these respective institutions of American national government. Substantive areas that will be examined include, but are not limited to: the historic origins of federalism and the separation of powers model of American Constitutionalism; the changing role(s) and functions of the respective institutions regarding domestic and foreign policy; the electoral processes that shape and influence Congressional and Presidential decision-making; the impact and consequences of the rise of the federal bureaucracy in the U.S.; and the social, political, and economic forces that have shaped contemporary Congressional and Presidential relations.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

POLI308 African Politics

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A survey and analysis of African politics. Provides a grounded understanding of the various contextual stages (pre-colonial, colonial, post-colonial, and post-post-colonial) that have shpaed and continue to influence African politics and policy.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

POLI310 Criminal Justice

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

Study of the institutions and processes by which criminal justice decisions are made, with emphasis on their legal and political aspects. The roles and interactions of law and rights, prosecution and defense, courts, police, and correctional institutions. Focus on the conflicting values and principles underlying criminal justice.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

POLI312 Media and Politics
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]
An exploration of the effects of the media (print, broadcast, electronic, and film) on political behavior in the American political system.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

POLI315 Politics in Developing Nations
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
Students will be introduced to the most prominent theories of political development and the major political, economic, and social issues common to developing nations.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite: None

POLI320 Latin American Politics

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Study of selected Latin American political systems in the 20th century, analyzing the impact of cultural and socio-political forces on modernization adn political development. Through the study of several cases, students will develop an understanding of the historical roots of issues facing Latin America today.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

POLI322 International Political Economy

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An introduction to international political economy, the study of the interaction of politics and economics in the international system. Includes discussion of how politically motivated policies and dynamics influence economic activity and how economic interests and calculations influence political events. Highlights the impact of international economic dynamics and institutions on domestic political, economic, and social conditions as well as the influence of domestic political structures and economic interests on the international system.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

POLI325 Labor-Management Relations

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

This course will introduce students to the general field of labor-management relations. The focus will be on the issues which face workers and employers in the U.S. labor markets, especially those issues to be resolved through collectively bargained contracts between employees and management.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

POLI328 Social Science Seminar

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A thematic or topical approach, with emphasis on historical/political/economic analysis. Treatment of historical, contemporary and/or comparative topics (for example, the historical roots and contemporary practice of terrorism and its political and economic impact; the impact of imperialism --political, economic, and historical-- in different global areas; the frontier experience of Russian Siberia and the American West) within a framework provided by the instructor.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

POLI330 Public Policy

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An upper-level course on the study of public policy. Includes an overview of the epistemological and methodological issues surrounding the study of public policy as they are viewed from different ideological perspectives. In addition the course provides an in-depth study of public policy related to poverty and welfare in the U.S.

Prerequisite: ( POLI105 )

Corequisite:   None

POLI335 Politics of Global Health

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

Explores the relationship between global health and social and economic development.   Students will learn about key players in international health-UN agencies, Ministries of Health, and Non-governmental Organizations. Students will consider the impact that political action has on the health and well being of individuals. The course will be global in scope but with a special emphasis on health problems affecting people in the developing world.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

POLI350 International Relations
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]
The study of current diplomatic, economic, and
political problems as they affect the balance of power, disarmament, the East-West struggle, the United Nations and the emerging states of Africa and Asia.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

POLI370 United Nations & International Organizations
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
A rapid survey of the history of international organizations prior to the United Nations and an intensive study of the United Nations. Emphasis upon the purposes, principles, membership, structure, and functions of the U.N. Attention to other international organizations for such purposes as mutual security, disarmament, and the pacific settlement of international disputes.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite: None

POLI380 Constitutional Law

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Analysis of the American constitutional system and its principles, with emphasis upon the Constitution, the Supreme Court, and judicial review. Constitutional principles, as applied by the Courts, to Congress, the President, federalism, state powers, and civil liberties.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

POLI381 Law and Society

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A study of American legal institutions and process. Common law, statutory law, administrative law, and constitutional law. The majority of the substantive materials in the course will be drawn from issues involving freedom of expression.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

POLI385 Constitutional Law II: Civil Liberties and Civil Rights

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

One of two courses in teh analysis of the American constitutional system and its principles, this course presents fundamental principles of civil liberties and civil rights, including the First Amendment, the rights of the accused, anti-discrimination, and voting rights.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

POLI390 Political Theory 1

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

The history of Western political thought from the Greeks through the 18th century. Theories pertaining to the nature of the state and the legitimate objectives of governments: authority, sovereignty, law, liberty, etc.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

POLI391 Political Theory 2

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

This is an advanced elective course in political theory focusing on major issues in 20th century political philosophy. An understanding of the Western tradition of political theory developed in POLI390 will be used as the background for a survey of major ideologies and for an in-depth exploration of three philosophic issues: freedom, equality, and democracy.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

POLI400 Junior/Senior Research Seminar

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

This is an advanced course in political science research. It provides the upper-level political science major with practice in the use of various research tools as part of a semester-long individual research project. The specific substantive focus of the course will vary, depending on the instructor.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

POLI405 Senior Capstone Management Seminar
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]
The seminar is intended to be an educational experience in which specialized skills and concepts introduced in individual courses in the major are integrated through investigation and discussion of broader issues in management.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

POLI600 Junior/Senior Research Seminar
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
This is an advanced course in political science research. It provides the upper-level political science major with practice in the use of various research tools as part of a semester-long individual research project. The specific substantive focus of the course will vary, depending on the instructor.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite: None

POLI628 Social Science Seminar

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A thematic or topical approach, with emphasis on historical/political/economic analysis. Treatment of historical, contemporary and/or comparative topics (for example, the historical roots and contemporary practice of terrorism and its political and economic impact; the impact of imperialism --political, economic, and historical-- in different global areas; the frontier experience of Russian Siberia and the American West) within a framework provided by the instructor.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

POLI630 Public Policy

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An upper-level course on the study of public policy. Includes an overview of the epistemological and methodological issues surrounding the study of public policy as they are viewed from different ideological perspectives. In addition the course provides an in-depth study of public policy related to poverty and welfare in the U.S.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

POLI650 International Relations

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

The study of current diplomatic, economic, and political problems as they affect the balance of power, disarmament, the East-West struggle, the United Nations and the emerging states of Africa and Asia.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

POLI690 Political Theory

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

The history of Western political thought from the Greeks through the 18th century. Theories pertaining to the nature of the state and the legitimate objectives of governments: authority, sovereignty, law, liberty, etc.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PORT201 Portuguese 3

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

The study of the foreign language in question, building upon the material learned in the Level 2 course and especially designed for students who wish to enhance their knowledge of that language.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PSYC100 Intro to Psychological Science

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

Introduces students to the field of psychology, the scientific study of behavior, including actions, thoughts, and feelings.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PSYC102 Child Development
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]An introduction to the major developmental processes that occur in childhood between conception and the onset of adolescence, including both normal and problematic aspects of development.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PSYC103 Adolescent Development
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]An introduction to the major developmental processes that occur during the period of adolescence and early adulthood (from the onset of puberty to the mid-20s), including both normal and problematic aspects of development.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite: None

PSYC111 Psychology of Early Childhood

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An in-depth examination of the physical, cognitive, emotional, and social processes and products of development that typically occur from conception through middle childhood, including both normal and problematic aspects of development.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PSYC119 First Year Student Seminar

[Minimum Semester Hours: 1 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 1 sh]

An introduction to the culture and mission of the university within the context of an academic discipline. The class will explore the purpose of college education, and students will be provided an opportunity to engage within an academic discipline. Students are introduced to basic learning and study skills within a content area. Through class readings, students engage in active learning. Co-curricular activities and the incorporation of a mentoring component facilitate connections with fellow students and faculty.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PSYC201 Educational Psychology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An introduction to the aspects of psychology related to the learning process and to the school as a social system. Among the topics considered are learning theories and their applications, the identification and evaluation of abilities and achievements, the effects of social deprivation on intellectual development, characteristics of students and teachers, styles of teacher leadership, and instructional technology.

Prerequisite: ( PSYC102 ) OR ( PSYC103 ) OR ( PSYC111 )

Corequisite:   None

PSYC202 Research Methods in Psychology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An exploration of psychological research methodology and theory through readings, lectures, discussions, and exercises.  Students acquire knowledge and skills in the use of science to answer questions related to psychology.  Experimental, quasi-experimental, and non-experimental methodologies are explored.  A central focus is to guide and assist students to become effective consumers of psychological information contained within both professional journals and the popular media.

Prerequisite: ( PSYC100 ) OR ( HONR180 )

Corequisite:   None

PSYC204 Writing for Psychology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Focuses on writing papers for psychology courses or professional journal articles. Students will develop information-seeking strategies, identify types of sources needed, and develop search strategies for locating psychology articles and related reference material. Students will learn to summarize material and incorporate it into well written experimental and non-experimental papers that conform to APA style.   Emphasis will also be given to basic writing elements, such as grammar, organization, and logical writing.

Prerequisite: ( ENGL100 AND PSYC100 ) OR ( ENGL100 AND HONR180 ) OR ( HONR111 AND HONR180 ) OR ( HONR111 AND PSYC100 )

Corequisite:   None

PSYC205 Applied Psychological Statistics

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

Designed to enable students to understand and apply descriptive and inferential statistics used in psychological research. Students will learn basic statistical concepts and computational methods used to test psychological hypotheses. Students will become proficient in basic data analysis using a computer statistical analysis package (e.g., SPSS). Emphasis will be on how to select appropriate statistics, interpret statistical results, draw appropriate conclusions from results and communicate results using APA style.

Prerequisite: ( MATH107 AND PSYC100 AND PSYC202 )

Corequisite:   None

PSYC207 Careers in Psychology
[Minimum Semester Hours: 2 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 2sh ]
Introduces to psychology majors the wide variety of career options available and the skills and knowledge necessary to achieve them.

Prerequisite: ( PSYC100 )

Corequisite:   None

PSYC212 Forensic Psychology
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
Provides a comprehensive discussion of the growing field of psychology and the law, also known as Legal Psychology or Forensic Psychology. The course introduces how psychological phenomena may influence the criminal justice system, including profiling, custody evaluations, competency evaluations, jury decision-making, and eyewitness testimony. Students will be provided with information on careers in psychology and the law, including the growing field of trial consulting.

Prerequisite: ( PSYC100 ) OR ( HONR180 )

Corequisite: None

PSYC215 Foundations of Biopsychology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Introduces the interacting role of our evolutionary past, our current genome, and immediate brain activity on our thoughts, feelings, and actions. Students will learn the necessary background in evolutionary biology, behavioral genetics, neuroanatomy, and neurophysiology. Subsequently, students will apply those biological principles toward a fuller understanding of mental illness, sexual behavior, cerebral lateralization, memory, and emotion. Students will finish with an ability to understand and reflectively evaluate related science news and research.

Prerequisite: ( PSYC100 ) OR ( HONR180 )

Corequisite:   None

PSYC235 Interpersonal & Leadership Skills

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An introduction to the fundamental interpersonal skills of empathy, persuasive assertion, self-presentation, and mediation. Students study leadership theory and research in such areas as decision-making, ethics, team building, conflict management, and personal influence. They complete service projects that develop their skills in each of these areas.   Students receive feedback on their interpersonal and leadership skills.

Prerequisite: ( PSYC*** ) OR ( HONR180 )

Corequisite:   None

PSYC240 Lifespan Development

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Introduces students to the major theories of physical, cognitive, and socioemotional development from conception through death. Students will learn about the three major domains of development -- physical, cognitive, and socioemotional -- during each period of the lifespan. Attention will also be given to the ways in which domains interact to guide development.

Prerequisite: ( PSYC100 ) OR ( HONR180 )

Corequisite:   None

PSYC250 Social Psychology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A study of individual behavior in social situations. The course focus is on how people think about, influence, and interact with others. Topics such as social cognition, social influence and social relations are explored and discussed. Students will learn about social psychological concepts, theories and research. Student will also apply social psychological concepts to everyday life.

Prerequisite: ( PSYC100 ) OR ( HONR180 )

Corequisite:   None

PSYC300 Primatology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Provides an opportunity for students to study the primate order that consists of some 230 different living species that are divided into 13 families. Old world and new world monkeys are studied as well as prosimians and the greater and lesser apes. Their evolution, taxonomy, morphology, habitats, social organizations, behavior and cognition are described. Endangered species are identified and strategies to promote their survival are discussed.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL101 AND PSYC100 ) OR ( BIOL101 AND PSYC102 ) OR ( BIOL101 AND SOCI101 ) OR ( ANTH101 AND BIOL101 ) OR ( BIOL106 AND PSYC100 ) OR ( BIOL106 AND PSYC102 ) OR ( BIOL106 AND SOCI101 ) OR ( ANTH101 AND BIOL106 )

Corequisite:   None

PSYC305 Theories of Learning

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

Investigates the major behavioral, social, cognitive, and physiological theories of human and comparative learning. Emphasis is placed on the practical application of theories to both education and psychotherapy

Prerequisite: ( PSYC100 AND PSYC202 )

Corequisite:   None

PSYC306 History & Systems of Psychology
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]An introduction to the historical antecedents of contemporary psychology from its foundation in philosophy and physiology through the major changes in the field over the last 200 years.

Prerequisite: ( PSYC100 ) and 6 additional sh of psychology

Corequisite:   None

PSYC307 Abnormal Psychology
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
Reviews the scientific study of psychological disorders. Assessment, diagnosis, and treatment are all discussed, with attention paid to the theoretical models that underlie current approaches in these areas. Students will study many of the most commonly diagnosed psychological disorders, along with the possible causes and available treatments for these disorders.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite: None

PSYC308 Psychology of Personality

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Introduction to the field of personality psychology, focusing on theories of personality. The course will focus on teh various ways in which personality has been explained as well as techniques used to measure personality. Students will critically evaluate personality theories, and develop an understanding of how to scientifically measure personality.

Prerequisite: ( PSYC*** AND PSYC100 ) OR ( HONR180 AND PSYC*** )

Corequisite:   None

PSYC310 Cognitive Psychology
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
Addresses data and theories in perception and human information processing.  An emphasis is placed on attention, memory, and visual as well as auditory processing.

Prerequisite: ( PSYC100 and PSYC202 or BIOL101 or BIOL106)

Corequisite:   None

PSYC313 Industrial & Organizational Psychology
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
An introduction to teh science of human behavior applied to industrial and organizational settings.  Students learn the fundamentals of quality of work life, job analysis, research methods, testing and assessment, training, ergonomics, performance evaluation, work motivation, stress management, leadership, ethics, and group dynamics.  Case studies or field experiences may be incorporated into this course.

Prerequisite: ( PSYC100 )

Corequisite:   None

PSYC315 Health Psychology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A survey course in the psychology of health and wellness. Findings using the bio-psycho-social model of health and disease are discussed. Topics such as the following are covered: preventive health; stress, coping, illness, and responses to treatment; pain management; behavioral aspects of chronic illnesses such as heart disease and cancer; psychoneuroimmunology; patient-provider communication; and positive psychology in health.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL101 AND HLTH130 AND PSYC100 ) OR ( BIOL101 AND PSYC100 AND PSYC215 ) OR ( BIOL101 AND PSYC100 AND PSYC410 ) OR ( BIOL106 AND HLTH130 AND PSYC100 ) OR ( BIOL106 AND PSYC100 AND PSYC215 ) OR ( BIOL106 AND PSYC100 AND PSYC410 )

Corequisite:   None

PSYC317 Sec Educ 2 Block: Educ Psycholog

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A study of knowledge about the learner, the learning process, and instructional planning, execution and assessment methodologies.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PSYC322 Drugs & Human Behavior

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

Introduction to information about the physiological, psychological, and social effects of prescription, over the counter, and illegal drugs. Theories of addiction and methods of rehabilitation will be covered and the government agencies and laws which regulate the manufacture and distribution of drugs will also be considered. An emphasis will be placed on the narcotics, stimulants, depressants, hallucinogens, and marijuana.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL101 AND PSYC100 ) OR ( BIOL106 AND PSYC100 ) OR ( BIOL101 AND HONR180 ) OR ( BIOL106 AND HONR180 ) OR ( HLTH130 AND PSYC100 ) OR ( HLTH130 AND HONR180 )

Corequisite:   None

PSYC328 Social Science Seminar
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]
This seminar explores various topics in psychology. Specific topic selection is based on the expertise and interest of the faculty.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PSYC330 Adult Development and Aging
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
Examines stability and change in the physical, intellectual, emotional, and social dimensions of adult life in typical humans (beginning roughly at age 18). The major challenges, tasks, hazards, crises, achievements, and satisfactions typically experienced at each stage or era will be explored and discussed.

Prerequisite: ( PSYC100 AND PSYC102 ) OR ( PSYC100 AND PSYC103 ) OR ( PSYC100 AND PSYC240 ) OR ( HONR180 AND PSYC102 ) OR ( HONR180 AND PSYC103 ) OR ( HONR180 AND PSYC240 )
Corequisite: None

PSYC400 Advanced Topics Seminar

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An in-depth exploration of three important contemporary topics in psychology in a seminar environment. Active student involvement includes scientific writing, presentation(s), and critical thinking about research design, theory, and results. The instructor teaching the course determines three topic areas to be covered.

Prerequisite: ( PSYC100 AND PSYC202 ) OR ( HONR180 AND PSYC202 )

Corequisite:   None

PSYC402 Sensation and Perception

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Explores sensation and perception as complementary processes that result in interpretations of the physical environment. The course will build upon prior knowledge of the biological basis of behavior and psychological research skills. It will focus on analyzing how information is gathered from the physical senses, converted into neural activity, and processed by the brain to create unique perceptions. Students will critically evaluate relevant theories, developing an advanced understanding of the role of sensation in perception.

Prerequisite: ( PSYC100 AND PSYC202 AND PSYC215 )

Corequisite:   None

PSYC409 Applying Research Methods in Psychology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Provides students with practical experience in conducting  psychological research.  Students engage in the following activities:  literature search, hypothesis construction, research design, data collection and analysis, and manuscript preparation.  Students complete at least one class research project and one small group or individually designed research project.  Students write research reports in APA format, as well as create and present a poster of their final project.

Prerequisite: ( PSYC202 AND PSYC205 AND MATH107 )

Corequisite:   None

PSYC410 Physiological Psychology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Provide students with an advanced understanding of the physiological mechanisms that govern human behavior. Neuroanatomical, neurochemical, and neurophysiological principles as related to psychopharmacology, sleep, ingestive behavior, neurological disorders, and schizophrenia will be thoroughly examined. An emphasis on knowledge obtained from experimental research, often involving animals, will allow for the advanced exploration of the biological basis of behavior.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL101 AND PSYC100 AND PSYC215 ) OR ( BIOL106 AND PSYC100 AND PSYC215 ) OR ( BIOL101 AND HONR180 AND PSYC215 ) OR ( BIOL106 AND HONR180 AND PSYC215 )

Corequisite:   None

PSYC412 Human Neuropsychology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An advanced exploration of the neuropsychological basis of human thought, feeling, and action that expands on the understanding of related neuroanatomical and neurophysiological principles. Students will apply those biological principles towards a fuller understanding of recovery of function, human social behavior and personality, dementias, and disorders of perceptions, and memory. An emphasis throughout the course will be placed on knowledge obtained from studies of normal and brain-damaged persons.

Prerequisite: ( BIOL101 AND PSYC100 AND PSYC215 ) OR ( BIOL106 AND PSYC100 AND PSYC215 )

Corequisite:   None

PSYC421 Psychological Assessment

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

Introduces theory and application of psychological assessments most commonly used for clinical and research purposes.  Assessments of intellectual functioning, normal and abnormal personality, and career interest inventories are explored.  This course does not prepare students to administer or interpret psychological assessments in professional settings.

Prerequisite: ( PSYC202 AND PSYC307 AND PSYC308 )

Corequisite:   None

PSYC425 Psychology of Women
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

An examination of the psychology of women including topics such as theoretical perspectives, research methods, development of gender roles, gender stereotypes, gender comparisons, women and work, love relationships, reproduction, sexuality, mental and physical health, and victimization of women.

Prerequisites:  6 semester hours of Psychology or 3 semester hours of psychology and 3 semester hours of Women and Gender Studies

Prerequisite: ( PSYC*** AND PSYC100 ) OR ( HONR180 AND PSYC*** )

Corequisite:   None

PSYC450 Psychotherapies
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
An introduction to the major approaches to psychotherapy. Attention will be paid to the theoretical underpinnings of these approaches, their techniques and methods, as well as their demonstrated effectiveness. Course material will be applied to case examples.

Prerequisite: ( PSYC307 AND PSYC308 )

Corequisite: None

PSYC470 Counseling Skills

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An introduction to the basic skills used in counseling. Empathy, probes, challenging, goal development, and strategy selection are all studied. An emphasis is placed on experiencing and practicing these skills, through class demonstrations and simulated counseling sessions.

Prerequisite: ( PSYC450 )

Corequisite:   None

PSYC612 Human Neuropsychology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An introduction to the field of Neuropsychology. The instructor will cover basic brain anatomy relevant to higher mental functions and will describe the methods used in Clinical Neuropsychological assessment. The course will cover language dysfunctions affecting speaking, comprehending, reading, and writing. It will also cover descriptions and assessment of computation, movement, and recognition deficits. Neglect, callosal, frontal lobe, amnestic, epileptic, emotional, and dementia syndromes will conclude the topics for the course. Students will learn through reading and discussing case histories of patients who have suffered brain damage. The students will be expected to design treatment and management plans for some of these patients.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PSYC625 Psychology of Women

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Examines the psychology of women in the following areas: The status of women from a historical and current perspective; developmental issues; achievement motivation; female sexuality; and psychological disorders prevalent in women.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PSYC628 Social Science Seminar

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

This seminar explores various topics in psychology. Specific topic selection is based on the expertise and interest of the faculty.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PSYC640 Adult Development and Aging

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Focuses on normal human development over the full span of the adult years, examining both stability and change in the physical, intellectual, emotional, and social dimensions of adult life. The major challenges, tasks, hazards, crises, achievements, and satisfactions typically experienced at each stage or era will be explored and discussed.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PYAS300 Introduction to Physician Assistant Studies

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

This course is designed as an introductory course for students contemplating a career as a physician assistant. The course will expose students to the history and development of the physician assistant profession, the role of the profession in American medicine, and skills required as a pre-requisite to entering the field. Particular emphasis will be placed o the role of physician assistants in caring for the needs of underserved populations. This course may be offered either face-to-face or via distance education.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PYAS600 Service Learning Module
[Minimum Semester Hours: 1 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 1sh ]
This module is one of the series of modules that comprises the didactic curriculum of the program. It prepares the student to participate in program service learning projects that focus on the health care needs of rural communities. Content areas in this module include: introduction to community health and preventive medicine, community health needs assessment, community screening and health promotion/disease prevention programs, diagnostic procedures used in health screening programs, and alternative therapies. Each student will participate in designing, implementing, and assessing community-based service learning projects in designated communities within proximity to the university.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PYAS601 Medical Decisions
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
An exploration of the many influences in medical decisions made by providers, patients, communities and governments. Institutional and psychological constraints will be considered when looking at legal, ethical, moral and personal medical decisions. Medical decisions will also be viewed through various multicultural prisms. Throughout the course, we will examine the balance of pragmatism and compassion in the quickly changing medical arena.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite: None

PYAS602 Introductory Module

[Minimum Semester Hours: 5 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 5 sh]

This module is one of the series of modules that comprises the didactic curriculum of the program. It introduces the student to fundamental concepts essential to understanding subsequent components of the curriculum. Content areas in this module include: fundamentals of medical research and reasoning, an overview of pathophysiology, introductory patient assessment including the medical history and physical examination, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, health promotion and disease prevention,, medical records, and rural and professional issues.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PYAS603 Gross Human Anatomy

[Minimum Semester Hours: 4 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 4 sh]

Gross anatomy is studied regionally stressing relationships of major structures, organs, vessels, and nerves. Human cadaver observation and dissection by students are included in the laboratory sessions. All major areas of the body are covered. References to the relationship of anatomical structures to pathology, traumatic injury and medicine are stressed.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PYAS604 Women's Health Module

[Minimum Semester Hours: 1.5 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 1.5 sh]

This module is one of the series of modules that comprises the didactic curriculum of the program. It provides both a disease oriented and problem-oriented approach to understanding the etiology, pathophysiology, manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of specific diseases encountered in gynecology and women’s health. Content areas in this module include: medical research and reasoning, anatomy, pathophysiology, patient assessment, diagnostic procedures, therapeutics, patient education, service learning, medical record keeping, and rural and professional issues.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PYAS605 Corrections Medicine

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Designed to provide the PA student with an overviw of health care systems in correctional facilities. The course will explore social, medical, health care policy, financial, ethical and other issues relevant to care of the incarcerated patient. It provides the student with the background and knowledge of the delivery of healthcare in the correctional facility setting.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PYAS606 Urology and Sexually Transmitted Disease Module

[Minimum Semester Hours: 0.5 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 0.5 sh]

This module is one of the series of modules that comprises the didactic curriculum of the program. It provides both a disease oriented and problem-oriented approach to understanding the etiology, pathophysiology, manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of specific diseases encountered in urology, including sexually transmitted diseases. Content areas in this module include: medical research and reasoning, anatomy, pathophysiology, patient assessment, diagnostic procedures, therapeutics, patient education, services learning, medical record keeping, and rural and professional issues.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PYAS608 Human Sexuality Module

[Minimum Semester Hours: 0.5 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 0.5sh ]

This module is one of the series of modules that comprises the didactic curriculum of the program. Personal attitudes toward sexual issues are explored in order to prepare the student to discuss issues of sexuality with patients. Other topics include human sexual response, sexual diversity, and the diagnosis and treatment of disorders of human sexual response.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PYAS610 Infectious Disease Module
[Minimum Semester Hours: 2 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 2sh ]
This module is one of the series of modules that comprises the didactic curriculum of the program. It provides both a disease oriented and problem-oriented approach to understanding the etiology, pathophysiology, manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of specific diseases encountered in infectious diseases. Content areas in this module include: medical research and reasoning, medical microbiology, pathphysiology, patient assessment, diagnostic procedures, therapeutics, patient education,, service learning, medical record keeping, and rural and professional issues.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PYAS612 Allergy and Immunology Module
[Minimum Semester Hours: 1 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 1 sh]
This module is one of the series of modules that comprises the didactic curriculum of the program. It provides both a disease oriented and problem-oriented approach to understanding the etiology, pathophysiology, manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of specific diseases encountered in allergy and immunology. Content areas in this module include: medical research and reasoning, anatomy, pathophysiology, patient assessment, diagnostic procedures, therapeutics, patient education, service learning, medical record keeping, and rural and professional issues.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite: None

PYAS614 Hematology Module

[Minimum Semester Hours: 1 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 1 sh]

This module is one of the series of modules that comprises the didactic curriculum of the program. It provides both a disease oriented and problem-oriented approach to understanding the etiology, pathophysiology, manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of specific diseases encountered in hematology. Content areas in this module include: medical research and reasoning, anatomy, pathophysiology, patient assessment, diagnostic procedures, therapeutics, patient education, service learning, medical record keeping, and rural and professional issues.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PYAS615 Underserved Populations

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An exploration of factors, especially historical, racial, ethnic, socioeconomic, and geographic, determined to create disparities in healthcare access, delivery, and policy. The course will specifically encompass/consider barriers known to affect these disparities in rural and urban regions as well as various healthcare settings including correctional facilities.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PYAS616 Oncology Module

[Minimum Semester Hours: 1 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 1 sh]

This module is one of the series of modules that comprises the didactic curriculum of the program. It provides both a disease oriented and problem-oriented approach to understanding the etiology, pathophysiology, manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of specific diseases encountered in oncology. Content areas in this module include: medical research and reasoning, anatomy, pathophysiology, patient assessment, diagnostic procedures, therapeutics, patient education, service learning, medical record keeping, and rural and professional issues.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PYAS618 Endocrinology Module

[Minimum Semester Hours: 1.5 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 1.5 sh]

This module is one of the series of modules that comprises the didactic curriculum of the program. It provides both a disease oriented and problem-oriented approach to understanding the etiology, pathophysiology, manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of specific diseases encountered in endcrinology. Content areas in this module include: medical research and reasoning, anatomy, pathophysiology, patient assessment, diagnostic procedures, therapeutics, patient education, service learning, medical record keeping, and rural and professional issues.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PYAS620 Cardiology Module

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

This module is one of the series of modules that comprises the didactic curriculum of the program. It provides both a disease oriented and problem-oriented approach to understanding the etiology, pathophysiology, manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of specific diseases encountered in cardiology. Content areas in this module include: medical research and reasoning, anatomy, pathophysiology, patient assessment, diagnostic procedures, therapeutics, patient education, service learning, medical record keeping, and rural and professional issues.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PYAS622 Pulmonary Module

[Minimum Semester Hours: 2 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 2sh ]

This module is one of the series of modules that comprises the didactic curriculum of the program. It provides both a disease oriented and problem-oriented approach to understanding the etiology, pathophysiology, manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of specific diseases encountered in pulmonary medicine. Content areas in this module include: medical research and reasoning, anatomy, pathophysiology, patient assessment, diagnostic proedures, therapeutics, patient education, service learning, medical record keeping, and rural and professional issues.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PYAS624 Nephrology Module
[Minimum Semester Hours: 1.5 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 1.5sh ]
This module is one of the series of modules that comprises the didactic curriculum of the program. It provides both a disease oriented and problem-oriented approach to understanding the etiology, pathophysiology, manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of specific diseases encountered in nephrology. Content areas in this module include: medical research and reasoning, anatomy, pathophysiology, patient assessment, diagnostic procedures, therapeutics, patient education, service learning, medical record keeping, and rural and professional issues.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PYAS626 Psychiatry Module
[Minimum Semester Hours: 2 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 2 sh]
This module is one of the series of modules that comprises the didactic curriculum of the program. It provides both a disease oriented and problem-oriented approach to understanding the etiology, pathophysiology, manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of specific diseases encountered in psychiatry. Content areas in this module include: medical research and reasoning, anatomy, pathophysiology, patient assessment, diagnostic procedure, therapeutics, patient education, service learning, medical record keeping, and rural and professional issues.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite: None

PYAS628 Ophthalmology Module

[Minimum Semester Hours: 1 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 1 sh]

This module is one of the series of modules that comprises the didactic curriculum of the program. It provides both a disease oriented and problem-oriented approach to understanding the etiology, pathophysiology, manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of specific diseases encountered in ophthalmology. Content areas in this module include: medical research and reasoning, anatomy, pathophysiology, patient assessment, diagnostic procedures, therapeutics, patient education, service learning, medical record keeping, and rural and professional issues.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PYAS630 Neurology Module

[Minimum Semester Hours: 2 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 2 sh]

This module is one of the series of modules that comprises the didactic curriculum of the program. It provides both a disease oriented and problem-oriented approach to understanding the etiology, pathophysiology, manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of specific diseases encountered in neurology. Content areas in this module include: medical research and reasoning, anatomy, pathophysiology, patient assessment, diagnostic procedures, therapeutics, patient education, service learning, medical record keeping, and rural and professional issues.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PYAS632 Orthopedics Module

[Minimum Semester Hours: 1 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 1 sh]

This module is one of the series of modules that comprises the didactic curriculum of the program. It provides both a disease oriented and problem-oriented approach to understanding the etiology, pathophysiology, manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of specific diseases encountered in orthopedics. Content areas in this module include: medical research and reasoning, anatomy, pathophysiology, patient assessment, diagnostic procedures, therapeutics, patient education, service learning, medical record keeping, and rural and professional issues.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PYAS634 Rheumatology Module

[Minimum Semester Hours: 1.5 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 1.5 sh]

This module is one of the series of modules that comprises the didactic curriculum of the program. It provides both a disease oriented and problem-oriented approach to understanding the etiology, pathophysiology, manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of specific diseases encountered in rheumatology. Content areas in this module include: medical research and reasoning, anatomy, pathophysiology, patient assessment, diagnostic procedures, therapeutics, patient education, service learning, medical record keeping, and rural and professional issues.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PYAS636 Dermatology Module

[Minimum Semester Hours: 1 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 1 sh]

This module is one of the series of modules that comprises the didactic curriculum of the program. It provides both a disease oriented and problem-oriented approach to understanding the etiology, pathophysiology, manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of specific diseases encountered in dermatology. Content areas in this module include: medical research and reasoning, anatomy, pathophysiology, patient assessment, diagnostic procedures, therapeutics, patient education, service learning, medical record keeping, and rural and professional issues.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PYAS638 Gastroenterology Module

[Minimum Semester Hours: 1.5 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 1.5sh ]

This module is one of the series of modules that comprises the didactic curriculum of the program. It provides both a disease oriented and problem-oriented approach to understanding the etiology, pathophysiology, manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of specific diseases encountered in gastroenterology. Content areas in this module include: medical research and reasoning, anatomy, pathophysiology, patient assessment, diagnostic procedures, therapeutics, patient education, service learning, medical record keeping, and rural and professional issues.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PYAS640 Obstetrics Module
[Minimum Semester Hours: 1.5 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 1.5sh ]
This module is one of the series of modules that comprises the didactic curriculum of the program. It provides both a disease oriented and problem-oriented approach to understanding the etiology, pathophysiology, manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of specific diseases encountered in obstetrics. Content areas in this module include: medical research and reasoning, anatomy, pathophysiology, patient assessment, diagnostic procedures, therapeutics, patient education, service learning, medical record keeping, and rural and professional issues.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PYAS642 Otorhinolaryngology Module
[Minimum Semester Hours: 1 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 1 sh]
This module is one of the series of modules that comprises the didactic curriculum of the program. It provides both a disease oriented and problem-oriented approach to understanding the etiology, pathophysiology, manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of specific diseases encountered in otorhinolaryngology. Content areas in this module include: medical research and reasoning, anatomy, pathophysiology, patient assessment, diagnostic procedures, therapeutics, patient education, service learning, medical record keeping, and rural and professional issues.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite: None

PYAS644 Pediatrics Module

[Minimum Semester Hours: 2 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 2 sh]

This module is one of the series of modules that comprises the didactic curriculum of the program. It provides both a disease oriented and problem-oriented approach to understanding the etiology, pathophysiology, manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of specific diseases encountered in pediatrics. Content areas in this module include: medical research and reasoning, anatomy, pathophysiology, patient assessment, diagnostic procedures, therapeutics, patient education, service learning, medical record keeping, and rural and professional issues.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PYAS646 Geriatrics Module

[Minimum Semester Hours: 1 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 1 sh]

This module is one of the series of modules that comprises the didactic curriculum of the program. It provides both a disease oriented and problem-oriented approach to understanding the etiology, pathophysiology, manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of specific diseases encountered in geriatrics. Content areas in this module include: medical research and reasoning, anatomy, pathophysiology, patient assessment, diagnostic procedures, therapeutics, patient education, service learning, medical record keeping, and rural and professional issues.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PYAS648 Surgery Module

[Minimum Semester Hours: 1.5 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 1.5 sh]

This module is one of the series of modules that comprises the didactic curriculum of the program. It provides both a disease oriented and problem-oriented approach to understanding the etiology, pathophysiology, manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of specific diseases encountered in surgery. Content areas in this module include: medical research and reasoning, anatomy, pathophysiology, patient assessment, diagnostic procedures, therapeutics, patient education, service learning, medical record keeping, and rural and professional issues.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PYAS650 Emergency Medicine Module

[Minimum Semester Hours: 1.5 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 1.5 sh]

This module is one of the series of modules that comprises the didactic curriculum of the program. It provides both a disease oriented and problem-oriented approach to understanding the etiology, pathophysiology, manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of specific diseases encountered in emergency medicine. Content areas in this module include: medical research and reasoning, anatomy, pathophysiology, patient assessment, diagnostic procedures, therapeutics, patient education, service learning, medical record keeping, and rural and professional issues. Content areas in this module include: medical research and reasoning, anatomy, pathophysiology, patient assessment, diagnostic procedures, therapeutics, patient education, service learning, medical record keeping, and rural and professional issues.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PYAS652 Alternative Medicine Module

[Minimum Semester Hours: 0.5 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 0.5 sh]

One of the series of modules that comprises the didactic curriculum of the program. This module provides the student with an orientation to alternative methods of health care, including such fields as acupuncture, chiropractic, massage, naturopathy, and culturally-based therapies.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PYAS654 Occupational Medicine Module

[Minimum Semester Hours: 1 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 1sh ]

This module is one of the series of modules that comprises the didactic curriculum of the program. It provides both a disease oriented and problem-oriented approach to understanding the etiology, pathophysiology, manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of specific diseases encountered in occupational medicine, with special emphasis on those occupations that predominate in rural areas.   Content areas in this module include: medical research and reasoning, epidemiology, anatomy, pathophysiology, patient assessment, diagnostic procedures, therapeutics, patient education, prevention, service learning, medical record keeping, and rural and professional issues.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PYAS661 Evidence Based Medicine I
[Minimum Semester Hours: 1 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 1sh ]
The first of three complimentary courses that will develop skills in Evidence Based Medicine (EBM). Students will build upon skills acquired during the first year of the program and apply EBM skills to authentic patient cases. Students will explore the limitations and the ethical implications of evidence based practice. The overall goal this course will be to extrapolate (EBM) use into their future practice as clinicians.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PYAS662 Evidence Based Medicine II
[Minimum Semester Hours: 1 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 1 sh]
The second of three complimentary courses that will develop skills in Evidence Based Medicine (EBM). Students will build upon skills acquired during the first year of the program EBM I. Students will apply EBM skills to authentic patient cases. Students will explore the limitations and the ethical implications of evidence based practice. The overall goal this course will be to extrapolate evidence based medicine use into their future practice as clinicians.

Prerequisite: ( PYAS661 )

Corequisite: None

PYAS663 Evidence Based Medicine III

[Minimum Semester Hours: 1 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 1 sh]

The third of three complimentary courses that will build upon skills acquired during EBM I and II. Students will further develop skills using the concepts of variability, validity, sensitivity, specificity and probability of testing. Students will apply EBM to their daily clinical practice. This course culminates in the written and oral presentation of the EBM capstone project.

Prerequisite: ( PYAS662 )

Corequisite:   None

PYAS664 Clinical Rotations I

[Minimum Semester Hours: 10 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 10 sh]

The first in a series of three rotations, 12 weeks in duration, designed to allow students to develop the knowledge, skills, abilities and attitudes required to care for patients of all age groups seen in primary care. Students will be assigned to a minimum of two clinical rotation sites in any of the following disciplines: surgery, internal medicine, pediatrics, OB/GYN, emergency medicine, or any subspecialty discipline that will develop skills required for generalist/primary care practice.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PYAS665 Clinical Rotations II

[Minimum Semester Hours: 15 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 15 sh]

An eighteen-week clinical experience, the second in a series of three courses, that allows students to develop the knowledge, skills, abilities and attitudes required to care for patients of all age groups seen in primary care. Students will be assigned to a minimum of three clinical rotation sites in any of the following disciplines: surgery, internal medicine, pediatrics, OB/GYN, emergency medicine, or any subspecialty discipline that will develop skills required for generalist/primary care practice.

Prerequisite: ( PYAS664 )

Corequisite:   None

PYAS666 Clinical Rotations III

[Minimum Semester Hours: 15 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 15 sh]

An eighteen-week clinical experience, the third in a series of three courses, that allows students to develop the knowledge, skills, abilities and attitudes required to care for patients of all age groups seen in primary care. Students will develop an understanding of the health promotion, disease prevention needs of communities and refine skills that develop problem-focused and disease-oriented approach diseases commonly seen in the primary care setting.

Prerequisite: ( PYAS665 )

Corequisite:   None

PYAS670 Clinical Rotation: Corrections Medicine

[Minimum Semester Hours: 6 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 6 sh]

This rotation is one of a series of rotations required by students enrolled in the LHU Physician Assistant Program Corrections Concentration. The course will expose the student to medical and ethical issues inherent to providing healthcare services in correctional settings. During the six-week correction medicine rotation, the PA student will develop appreciation for the care of the incarcerated patient with particular emphasis being placed on the uniqueness of such care in the corrections setting.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:  None

PYAS671 Clinical Rotation: Obstetrics and Gynecology

[Minimum Semester Hours: 6 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 6sh ]

During this six-week clinical rotation, the student is assigned to a preceptor who practices obstetrics and gynecology/maternal and child health. The student will develop the knowledge, skills, abilities and attitudes required to care for obstetric and gynecologic patients in the office and hospital settings. Students will develop both a problem-oriented and disease-oriented approach to understanding the etiology, pathophysiology, manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of common obstetric and gynecologic problems seen in primary care.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PYAS672 Clinical Rotation: General Surgery
[Minimum Semester Hours: 6 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 6sh ]
This six-week clinical rotation is one of a series of five designed to develop a core base of medical knowledge for the Physician Assistant in Rural Primary Care student. Students will be assigned to a physician preceptor, who will act as both mentor and teacher, developing the surgical acumen required in primary care practice. Students will be required to develop a problem and disease oriented approach to the etiology, pathophysiology, manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of surgical disease commonly seen in the primary care setting.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PYAS673 Clinical Rotation: Pediatrics
[Minimum Semester Hours: 6 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 6 sh]
In this six-week clinical rotation, the student is assigned to a preceptor who practices pediatrics/maternal and child health. The student will develop the knowledge, skills, abilities and attitudes required to care for pediatric patients in office and hospital settings. The student will develop both a problem-oriented and disease-oriented approach to understanding the etiology, pathophysiology, manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of common pediatric problems seen in primary care.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite: None

PYAS674 Clinical Rotation: Internal Medicine

[Minimum Semester Hours: 6 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 6 sh]

In this six-week clinical rotation, the student is assigned to an internist physician preceptor, who will serve both as mentor and clinical instructor. The student will develop the knowledge, skills, abilities and attitudes required to care for the adult and geriatric patient in rural primary care. Students will develop both a problem-oriented and disease-oriented approach to the etiology, pathophysiology, manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases commonly seen in the primary care setting.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PYAS675 Clinical Rotation: Elective

[Minimum Semester Hours: 6 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 6 sh]

This course is one in a series of five clinical rotations designed to develop a core base of medical knowledge for the Physician Assistant in Rural Primary Care student. Students will be assigned to a physician preceptor, who will serve as both mentor and teacher, developing the skills required to care for the patient in rural primary care. The elective rotation allows the student to develop skills in a primary care subspecialty outside the four core rotations that are requirements within the curriculum. Areas considered appropriate for elective rotations include, but are not limited to: emergency medicine, Geriatrics, Psychiatry, oncology, Otolaryngology, Orthopaedics, or any other area that is appropriate to rural primary care practice. Students will be required to develop an appreciation of epedemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, and management of diseases that commonly present in primary care that are shared with the primary care sub-specialist.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PYAS676 Preceptorship in Rural Primary Care

[Minimum Semester Hours: 18 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 18 sh]

In this eighteen-week clinical preceptorship, the student is assigned to a primary care physician preceptor, who will serve both as mentor and clinical instructor. The student will develop the knowledge, skills, abilities and attitudes required to care for the pediatric, adult and geriatric patient in rural primary care. In addition to developing a problem-oriented and disease-oriented approach to the etiology, pathophysiology, manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases commonly seen in the primary care setting, the student will also develop an understanding of the health promotion, disease prevention needs of the community in which they are located.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PYAS677 Clinical Rotation: Emergency Medicine

[Minimum Semester Hours: 6 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 6 sh]

This rotation is one of a series of rotations required by students enrolled in the LHU Physician Assistant Program. The course will expose the student to medical and ethical issues inherent to providing healthcare services in an emergency room setting. During the six-week rotation the PA student will develop appreciation for the care of the emergency department patient with particular emphasis being placed on the uniqueness of such care in the emergency setting.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

PYAS690 Summative Remediation Module

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

This module represents a customized unit of study that will assist the student in meeting the requirements set forth in the Physician Assistant Program Summative Evaluation Process. The LHU PA Program summative evaluation is designed to evaluate student's mastery of areas including cognitive, psychomotor and affective skills required for entry level clinical practice as a physician assistant. Enrollment is limited to students who, at the completion of the 24-month Physician Assistant Curriculum, have not met teh standards set forth in summative evaluation or who desire to enhance their preparation for National Board Certification.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None

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